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Author Topic: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?  (Read 3785 times)

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Offline onus

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Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« on: March 12, 2013, 11:46:32 AM »
I'm just following up on my recent trip. I'm hoping i put this in the correct section.

As a 20 year old guy. I have nothing holding me down here. Other than finishing college and my family and friends.

I just recently got my Associates Degree. Nothing fancy but something to get me moving up around here. I do tech support. 5 years of experience. If i could get a telecommuting job i would be golden. Other than only being allowed to stay half the year.

I know i will have to learn the language. Working on that currently. I can now read Cyrillic.  :clapping: Which is good considering i really only started two months ago. Pronouncing the words with the correct stress and reading with any speed is still a challenge.

I'm just wondering if anyone has done this and the challenges you have faced?

I thoroughly enjoy the "European" way of life. I like that stores can be walked too, houses / apartments aren't huge, you don't need to own a car.  Maybe Russia isn't the perfect example but its something. It has its challenges to face like every country.  It does have a very unique character that i find very interesting.


Offline Vasilisa

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2013, 12:46:01 PM »
I am planning on moving back to Russia this year.

Offline Boethius

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2013, 12:49:30 PM »
I hope things work out for you, Vasilisa.  It must be difficult to be so far from family when you have not found your other half.
To love someone means to see him as God intended him. - Fyodor Dostoevksy

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2013, 12:50:59 PM »
I hope things work out for you, Vasilisa.  It must be difficult to be so far from family when you have not found your other half.
Thank you:)

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2013, 01:35:46 PM »
I am planning on moving back to Russia this year.

I wish you the best.  Where is home?

Offline Muzh

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2013, 01:37:17 PM »
Hi Jack!
"Mr Putin is discovering that global finance is more frightened of the US Securities and Exchange Commission than Russian T90 tanks."

Offline onus

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2013, 08:16:34 AM »
Glad to see other people have done the same.

Good luck!

Offline OmegaSupreme

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2013, 08:42:48 AM »
I just recently moved to Ukraine. I've only been here for a few weeks now, I can definitely give you a heads-up on a few things. These can apply equally both to tourists and expats:


1. Do NOT underestimate the importance of learning the language. I thought I had a decent handle on Russian...until I got here. I can understand quite a bit of written Russian, but hearing it fired back at you rapid-fire is a different story.


2. Be prepared to walk. Everywhere. I can't say anything specifically about Russia, as my only experience there was in Terminal D of Sheremetyevo Airport in Moscow, but in Ukraine, you'll be in for a shock when you see the roads. Some places here appear to have been a recent war zone. Marshrutki can be a hassle if you don't speak or understand Russian. Taxis can help, but obviously you don't want to rely on them for doing every day tasks. All drivers here are f***ing crazy. The pedestrian does NOT have the right of way.


3. Do NOT drink the tap water! This should be common sense for anyone who has ever traveled internationally, but it bears repeating. Thankfully, bottled water is both plentiful and cheap.


4. It's never a bad idea to make some friends in your destination city prior to arrival. I did just that, and I'd be completely lost without them.


5. Make sure you have plenty of money saved up before you go. Again, this should be common sense.


6. Learn as much about your destination city as you possibly can prior to arrival. Yet again, common sense.


7. Learn how to dress like a local. Foreigners stick out like a sore thumb. You'll probably never fully integrate, but the saying "When in Rome..." exists for a reason. Go hit your local Adidas store and buy a track suit. Next, go to your local clothing store and get some skinny jeans. Then, hit a shoe store and find the shoes with the pointiest tips. Finally, shave your head or get a crew cut. At that point, you should be well on your way.


8. Be aware of your surroundings at all times. Don't wander the streets at night while drunk. Don't speak English loudly at every opportunity. Don't stare at people, especially police/militsiya. Yet again, use common sense.


9. Be prepared for a complete lack of customer service. They have almost no concept of it here, although it hasn't been quite as bad as I was lead to believe prior to arriving. You'll get used to it pretty quickly, though.


10. Rule 1 bears repeating again. LEARN AS MUCH OF THE LOCAL LANGUAGE AS YOU CAN! The more you know, the easier life will be for you.


There are tons more rules/tips that apply, but these are a few that immediately come to mind.

Offline onus

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2013, 09:08:38 AM »
I just recently moved to Ukraine. I've only been here for a few weeks now, I can definitely give you a heads-up on a few things. These can apply equally both to tourists and expats:


1. Do NOT underestimate the importance of learning the language. I thought I had a decent handle on Russian...until I got here. I can understand quite a bit of written Russian, but hearing it fired back at you rapid-fire is a different story.


2. Be prepared to walk. Everywhere. I can't say anything specifically about Russia, as my only experience there was in Terminal D of Sheremetyevo Airport in Moscow, but in Ukraine, you'll be in for a shock when you see the roads. Some places here appear to have been a recent war zone. Marshrutki can be a hassle if you don't speak or understand Russian. Taxis can help, but obviously you don't want to rely on them for doing every day tasks. All drivers here are f***ing crazy. The pedestrian does NOT have the right of way.


3. Do NOT drink the tap water! This should be common sense for anyone who has ever traveled internationally, but it bears repeating. Thankfully, bottled water is both plentiful and cheap.


4. It's never a bad idea to make some friends in your destination city prior to arrival. I did just that, and I'd be completely lost without them.


5. Make sure you have plenty of money saved up before you go. Again, this should be common sense.


6. Learn as much about your destination city as you possibly can prior to arrival. Yet again, common sense.


7. Learn how to dress like a local. Foreigners stick out like a sore thumb. You'll probably never fully integrate, but the saying "When in Rome..." exists for a reason. Go hit your local Adidas store and buy a track suit. Next, go to your local clothing store and get some skinny jeans. Then, hit a shoe store and find the shoes with the pointiest tips. Finally, shave your head or get a crew cut. At that point, you should be well on your way.


8. Be aware of your surroundings at all times. Don't wander the streets at night while drunk. Don't speak English loudly at every opportunity. Don't stare at people, especially police/militsiya. Yet again, use common sense.


9. Be prepared for a complete lack of customer service. They have almost no concept of it here, although it hasn't been quite as bad as I was lead to believe prior to arriving. You'll get used to it pretty quickly, though.


10. Rule 1 bears repeating again. LEARN AS MUCH OF THE LOCAL LANGUAGE AS YOU CAN! The more you know, the easier life will be for you.


There are tons more rules/tips that apply, but these are a few that immediately come to mind.

I have formed the same consulsions on my trip to Russia a few weeks.

I agree. This isn't western Europe where i can speak English to everyone. It's necessary. Nothing is in English as soon as you step out of Sheremetyevo. I enjoy the whole ignorance is bliss thing not knowing what anyone is saying.

Ya the marskrutka can be interesting but i don't go by myself so it was never a big deal so far. I'd still like to see that at home since some bus routes well suck around here.

I heard from my Girlfriend's mom that they are cracking down and fining people for not giving pedestrians the right of way atleast in Vologda. Everyone was stopping to let pedestrians go. Then again it wouldn't be much different from here where noone stops either.

Walking is very true but from my experience there was some walking to Public Transportation spots.

Yuck that water smells bad can't imagine what it tastes like, even washing in that stuff just feels horrible. Girlfriend has tons of bottled water at home. Bought in bulk from a local place. 

Check that one.

Good on this too.

Normal stuff. I live in a pretty crappy area so i've learned the whole street smarts things a long long time ago.

I have to figure that one out. People seem to have this odd sense of fasion. Good thing is that everyone looks russian in the winter. I had to requesit fur jacket.

Thats what i miss from home. Helpful and respected police.

That couldn't be further from the truth. I wonder sometimes if places even want to sell things?

Offline ML

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2013, 09:38:09 AM »
I just recently moved to Ukraine. I've only been here for a few weeks now, I can definitely give you a heads-up on a few things. These can apply equally both to tourists and expats:


1. Do NOT underestimate the importance of learning the language. I thought I had a decent handle on Russian...until I got here. I can understand quite a bit of written Russian, but hearing it fired back at you rapid-fire is a different story.


2. Be prepared to walk. Everywhere. I can't say anything specifically about Russia, as my only experience there was in Terminal D of Sheremetyevo Airport in Moscow, but in Ukraine, you'll be in for a shock when you see the roads. Some places here appear to have been a recent war zone. Marshrutki can be a hassle if you don't speak or understand Russian. Taxis can help, but obviously you don't want to rely on them for doing every day tasks. All drivers here are f***ing crazy. The pedestrian does NOT have the right of way.


3. Do NOT drink the tap water! This should be common sense for anyone who has ever traveled internationally, but it bears repeating. Thankfully, bottled water is both plentiful and cheap.


4. It's never a bad idea to make some friends in your destination city prior to arrival. I did just that, and I'd be completely lost without them.


5. Make sure you have plenty of money saved up before you go. Again, this should be common sense.


6. Learn as much about your destination city as you possibly can prior to arrival. Yet again, common sense.


7. Learn how to dress like a local. Foreigners stick out like a sore thumb. You'll probably never fully integrate, but the saying "When in Rome..." exists for a reason. Go hit your local Adidas store and buy a track suit. Next, go to your local clothing store and get some skinny jeans. Then, hit a shoe store and find the shoes with the pointiest tips. Finally, shave your head or get a crew cut. At that point, you should be well on your way.


8. Be aware of your surroundings at all times. Don't wander the streets at night while drunk. Don't speak English loudly at every opportunity. Don't stare at people, especially police/militsiya. Yet again, use common sense.


9. Be prepared for a complete lack of customer service. They have almost no concept of it here, although it hasn't been quite as bad as I was lead to believe prior to arriving. You'll get used to it pretty quickly, though.


10. Rule 1 bears repeating again. LEARN AS MUCH OF THE LOCAL LANGUAGE AS YOU CAN! The more you know, the easier life will be for you.


There are tons more rules/tips that apply, but these are a few that immediately come to mind.

Just a quick note:  My Gal (grew up in small town and then lived in Kyiv 20 years) just read this and didn't agree with some.

Matrushki is not that hard, even if you know little Russian.  Often a person on board knows English and will help.

Not many people go on the streets wearing track suits.

Pointy shoes for men has been phasing out over last few years.

Most men do not have crew cuts or shave head entirely.

English is commonly heard on street,  restaurants, theatres, etc., in major cities and causes no problems for speakers.  Of course don't speak it loudly on streets at 2 AM in morning in bar areas; or even be out on streets at that time.

Roads have never been good, but they are especially bad this year because of the terrible winter that is still in progress.
Winston Churchill.  “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.”

Offline mendeleyev

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2013, 10:29:02 AM »
Quote
I have formed the same consulsions on my trip to Russia a few weeks.

I agree. This isn't western Europe where i can speak English to everyone. It's necessary. Nothing is in English as soon as you step out of Sheremetyevo. I enjoy the whole ignorance is bliss thing not knowing what anyone is saying.

Ya the marskrutka can be interesting but i don't go by myself so it was never a big deal so far. I'd still like to see that at home since some bus routes well suck around here.

I heard from my Girlfriend's mom that they are cracking down and fining people for not giving pedestrians the right of way atleast in Vologda. Everyone was stopping to let pedestrians go. Then again it wouldn't be much different from here where noone stops either.

Walking is very true but from my experience there was some walking to Public Transportation spots.

Yuck that water smells bad can't imagine what it tastes like, even washing in that stuff just feels horrible. Girlfriend has tons of bottled water at home. Bought in bulk from a local place. 

Check that one.

Good on this too.

Normal stuff. I live in a pretty crappy area so i've learned the whole street smarts things a long long time ago.

I have to figure that one out. People seem to have this odd sense of fasion. Good thing is that everyone looks russian in the winter. I had to requesit fur jacket.

Thats what i miss from home. Helpful and respected police.

That couldn't be further from the truth. I wonder sometimes if places even want to sell things?


In agreement with ML, learning some Russian will earn you respect although from SVO and on into Moscow proper, signs are being posted in Russian and English.  There is hardly a place in SVO that isn't bi-lingual from cafes to toilet signs to directions inside the airport to where to exchange money and buy Aeroexpress tickets.  English is a very popular language to learn in most large Russian and Ukrainian cities and many who are learning English enjoy even the most casual conversation in order to practice.

Police in Moscow are far different than in the past.  Many of them speak English to varying degrees and can be helpful.  They're really no longer something to be feared as a tourist or legal foreign resident.

There really is no way to camouflage the fact that you're a foreigner and eventually your style of walking will begin to conform and that will help as opposed to trying to dress like a Russian.  I knew that I'd begun at least in an elementary way to blend in when a police officer stopped to ask me directions in our neighborhood.  We both had a good laugh because as soon as I began to answer in Russian he switched to English and we both got a chuckle at that.  In English he wished me a safe day and hurried off.

It is about time that they crack down on pedestrian right of way issues.  Our Aunt Lyuba was seriously injured in a pedestrian crosswalk a few years back and sustained brain damage after being hit by a speeding car.  The driver was never fined or punished although by-standers got the license number and the driver was brought in for questioning.  The driver was related to a local official and while she was still in the hospital the investigation was closed by a judge without Aunt Lyuba ever having her story heard in court.

We use a water filter and bottled water in the kitchen however brush our teeth in Moscow tap water.  I used to be more fearful of Russian tap water but unless it catches on fire, don't really give it that much thought.  We have a chai-nik like most kitchens so water for tea is naturally boiled anyway.

Moscow has an English language radio station targeted to serve Expats and Tourists at 105.2 FM.  Unfortunately the programming and announcers are at best small time amateurs and a poor representation of what radio should sound like in a major city.  At least the news, supplied by Russia Today audio, is professional.  Online they're at: http://www.moskva.fm/stations/FM_105.2  You'll need to click the play button in the middle of the page and have flash available if listening online.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2013, 12:38:46 PM by mendeleyev »
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Offline LiveFromUkraine

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2013, 12:00:13 PM »
Kiev had more English but most other places I have been too did not.  I lived in Odessa and found English very, very limited.

Offline CDW

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2013, 12:54:58 PM »
Before you think about moving to Russia, you need to take a vacation first.
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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2013, 06:32:49 PM »
Thanks guys for all the helpful tips.

Before you think about moving to Russia, you need to take a vacation first.

I was just there two weeks ago.

Offline steve057

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2013, 09:22:26 AM »
I have thought about moving there and if she doesn't get her visa for some reason that is an option for us. Can't imagine why she wouldn't get her visa though?

1) Learning Russian is very important to say the least. Mine sucks and I know just enough to keep me out of trouble (most of the time).
2) Watch where you are walking. I've never tripped more in my life than I have in Russia. Their sidewalks and steps are terrible even in the government buildings. Like the post office. Walkways are not lite well at night which makes it worse.
3) You will walk just about everywhere you go. Not to bad in the summer time but in the winter,OMG! I was there at New Years this year and talk about cold. Walking then becomes a pain in the butt. As you know they do have  decent trams, metro's and buses there so not to bad really but you have to walk to get there.
4) Always be aware of where you are. I've never had problems there but I do watch where I go as well.
5) Don't drink the water. It's nasty believe me.
6) As far as dressing I wear the same clothes there I do here and don't seem to have a problem. Most people are dressed the same but I do see the track suits a lot on men. Most wear jeans of one brand or another or dark pants. I must blend in well because I've had many people come up to me and ask questions.
7) Enjoy yourself. Think of it as an adventure (which it is) a learning experience and have fun with it.
8)  Never expect service like you get here in our country. It's not going to happen. I love to watch the people at the post office fight for position. I just sit back and shake my head.
9) Never had any problems with the police but I can tell you my lady doesn't like them at all. They don't trust them and won't ask them anything. I wanted to ask one in Moscow on one trip and she grabbed my arm and said Neyt!  Ok honey!:) Ended up asking someone else and she liked that better.
10) People (at least in my experience) have been very helpful and seem to like Americans. I'm sure there are those that don't but I have not seen them yet. Her friends have taken me in like I'm family and I've never been treated so good!:) Their hospitality is great and the food is even better. :)
Have fun!:)
« Last Edit: June 18, 2013, 09:26:30 AM by steve057 »

Offline Chicagoguy

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2013, 10:20:09 AM »
Women I dated and my wife seem to somehow get to the front of lines. Don't quite understand but never saw anyone complain.
I was in a long line McDonalds one time and guys who looked like mafia types walked right past about 20 of us. Usually I hate this but one look at these guys and I said nothing !

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2013, 12:12:18 PM »
I drink Moscow tap water from time to time but do agree that in general it is better to slowly kill yourself with the chemicals that leach from the plastic into the bottled water.

Some cities however I'd first light a match to burn all the gas and chemicals from the water.  :D   On a serious note however if no bottled water is available, use a chai-nik (electric water kettle) to boil it first.

I used to use bottle water to brush my teeth but these days unless the water smells or takes on a colour, I brush with tap water.
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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2013, 04:41:17 PM »
9) Never had any problems with the police but I can tell you my lady doesn't like them at all. They don't trust them and won't ask them anything.


It will take a very long time for FSU police to restore it's reputation if ever...   

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Re: Anyone move from the USA to Russia?
« Reply #18 on: June 21, 2013, 04:20:54 PM »
I used to use bottle water to brush my teeth but these days unless the water smells or takes on a colour, I brush with tap water.

I don't think you can see them there bacteria thingys.   :o 8)
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