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Author Topic: Food from the FSU; What did you love? What did you hate?  (Read 3359 times)

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Online Hammer2722

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Re: Food from the FSU; What did you love? What did you hate?
« Reply #25 on: June 26, 2019, 10:19:15 AM »
Hate anything with beets in it.

Lots of FSU people here where I live. Not many restaurants with an FSU theme though. I doubt they'll be successful as Italian, Japanese, Chinese, or Mexican cuisine.

there are a few small places north of Seattle (Lynnwood to Everette) that serve FSU dishes....Lots of markets here that cater to FSU people as well.
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Online BillyB

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Re: Food from the FSU; What did you love? What did you hate?
« Reply #26 on: June 26, 2019, 09:21:55 PM »
I don't know where you live (Arizona, I thought) but they have a couple
places in Phoenix and Tempe.

Live in Washington State in a suburb of Seattle.

there are a few small places north of Seattle (Lynnwood to Everette) that serve FSU dishes....Lots of markets here that cater to FSU people as well.

With over 100,000 FSU living in the Puget Sound area, there will be a demand for Eastern European markets and I see them all over the place but only a few restaurants. If people from other cultures around aren't craving the food, we won't see growth in FSU themed restaurants.
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Online Faux Pas

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Re: Food from the FSU; What did you love? What did you hate?
« Reply #27 on: July 03, 2019, 11:09:12 AM »

We've never had a Russian market where we live so it's always been an
event when we've gone. Occasionally when I was in Denver on business,
I'll go to one of the Russian markets and buy a few things to surprise her
(it always does). 

They have a couple markets in Austin but not nearly as big or as busy as
the ones in Denver.

We've never had a Russian market in a decent driving distance either. My wife has someplace online she gets her necessities. There was an international market in Tulsa when we lived in Oklahoma that had Russian items, mostly East Indian. Later we discovered a Russian/Ukrainian market in Dallas and we go to Dallas a few times a year. In any event, I form the same line as you at the check out counter.

My MIL bless her heart is a great cook however, there is some kind of fried fish cake she makes that almost gagged me. It took all I could do to keep a straight face as I forced it down. Numerous shots of Samogon was quickly to follow. Other than that nothing I could say I "hate" I don't even mind the gelatin stuff so much. The various salads I don't particularly care for either but I can eat them.

I love Solyanka (sp) in most any style. But the pickled mushrooms I could eat all day. One of the MIL friends whom I have never met sends me a jar of these really small pickled mushrooms every trip I make. They are delicious and great with beer. The last trip she sent 2 jars
« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 11:14:25 AM by Faux Pas »

Online 2tallbill

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Food from the FSU; What did you love? What did you hate?
« Reply #28 on: July 03, 2019, 12:59:12 PM »
In any event, I form the same line as you at the check out counter.

One time when I was pretending to be horribly offended at not getting my
money back one of the husbands overheard me and offered to pay me as
well. I said nyet! Ya draznil! shutka (No, I was teasing..... joke)

So now I only pretend to getting fleeced around my Angel Eyes.

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Kiss the girl, don't ask her first.

Online Gator

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Re: Food from the FSU; What did you love? What did you hate?
« Reply #29 on: July 03, 2019, 02:42:39 PM »
Earlier we talked a little about salo.  My stepson has a part-time job  for a large food store chain.  One of the managers is a RW and she told him the store sold a good salo substitute.  He purchased some, and he and my wife devoured it.   

They excitedly told me they found salo in the food store.  I examined this salo,  and it was a slab of white pork fat with a continuous sliver of reddish meat (i. e., fatty bacon)    I then examined the packaging, and read "Smithfield Salt Pork."   I discussed that this is not the same as Ukranian salo.  They replied it is close enough. 

This American salo is fatback cured in a wet brine without seasonings. 

Online Faux Pas

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Re: Food from the FSU; What did you love? What did you hate?
« Reply #30 on: July 03, 2019, 02:56:15 PM »
Earlier we talked a little about salo.  My stepson has a part-time job  for a large food store chain.  One of the managers is a RW and she told him the store sold a good salo substitute.  He purchased some, and he and my wife devoured it.   

They excitedly told me they found salo in the food store.  I examined this salo,  and it was a slab of white pork fat with a continuous sliver of reddish meat (i. e., fatty bacon)    I then examined the packaging, and read "Smithfield Salt Pork."   I discussed that this is not the same as Ukranian salo.  They replied it is close enough. 

This American salo is fatback cured in a wet brine without seasonings.

I've never had the opportunity for the  Ukrainian salo but fatback I know all about. I wouldn't eat it raw. I grew up on it and still eat it on occasion. Fried or seasoning for beans and greens. Good groceries. I use Smithfield sometimes

Online Gator

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Re: Food from the FSU; What did you love? What did you hate?
« Reply #31 on: July 03, 2019, 03:11:34 PM »
I've never had the opportunity for the  Ukrainian salo but fatback I know all about. I wouldn't eat it raw. I grew up on it and still eat it on occasion. Fried or seasoning for beans and greens. Good groceries. I use Smithfield sometimes

My wife microwaved it until it sizzled.   My serving in Ukraine was at room temperature and  easily spreadable on bread as if it were butter.   

Online krimster2

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Re: Food from the FSU; What did you love? What did you hate?
« Reply #32 on: July 03, 2019, 03:17:41 PM »
back in the daze of Rancho Del Krimster
I came up with the idea of introducing “Bekon” to Russians livin in Krim

wife’s family TOTALLY took to raising as much pork as I could buy...
little baby pigs cost $20 each shortly after they’re born,
so I snap up whole litters at a time
everyone within a 10 village radius knew I was a pig buyer
and a tough negotiator
but I had me a mess of pigs and chickens
on my little 3x20 sotek mega dacha about 20 miles outside of Sevastopol...
complete with independent water supply from an in-ground pump
cement in-ground pool with a satellite dish that could get HBO

and a farm lada with a completely rebuilt engine I bought for $300
it wasn’t street legal, but I could drive it around in the countryside like an off road vehicle

sweet! used to have AMAZING adventures driving this thing, would cruise for 30-40 miles into the Crimean wilderness
with criss crossing dirt farm roads, canal paths, and ancient cobble stone roads in the middle of mountain forests
that are the remains of Greek and Roman trading routes...


at hawg butchering time
would get about 20 pounds of pork belly per pig
found an aromatic local wood for smoking
would hack down some of it and haul it back with the lada
family built a simple smoke house
Russians all loved this homemade bekon much more than salo
simple ingredients;
raw beet sugar from Odessa
kosher salt from Odessa
and a few local spices
it was a 10 hour one way drive to Odessa from Sevastopol
in a Mitsubishi Colt

plus we had hundreds of eggs each month
so we ate custard pies a lot
and we had an evil tempered cow named marta
who besides cream, milk, and butter also gave us two different types of homemade unpasteurized cheese
and fresh churned butter made in a real old time wooden churn
wrapped in white paper and stored in big squares in an ancient Soviet refrigerator
with a wheezing compressor

we also had two huge vegetable gardens
and cherry, peach and apricot trees and raspberry and grape vines

in a post apocalyptic world, we could've traded our surplus for other meat and fruit
mother-in-law "canned" hundreds of mason jars of peaches, raspberries, apricots
was all stored in a spare room, a small mountain of jars

big hazard in a Crimean village
were the early morning traffic jams
caused by inconsiderate drivers
who thought they OWNED the whole freaking road...
of course, THEY WOULD HONK at me when I tried to merge into their lane...

would have water and electricity intermittently
so needed backups
had a deep well pump
water treatment and 2000 liter pvc lined water storage tank
and honda generator
powering a 50 inch plasma TV
« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 09:28:47 PM by krimster2 »

Offline siberia

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Re: Food from the FSU; What did you love? What did you hate?
« Reply #33 on: July 03, 2019, 04:03:18 PM »
I like almost all food from FSU with the exception of holodets/studen and some fish dishes. I do eat shuba but mostly because I can get thru the fish part because of all the other ingredients.  As a mayo lover, I love the different salads and make a great Salat Olivier.


I especially love Georgian food. My close friend lived in Batumi as an adult, even though she is Ukrainian and taught me how to make lots of Georgian dishes.


I even ate salo a few times. I remember when my ex husband (the Siberian) came to the USA and I was making breakfast and he saw me taking bacon out to fry and he wondered why I was going to cook that!!  (I did not know about salo at that point) I said, because I don't want to get worms!  (am old, so we were always taught that uncooked or rare pork would give us worms! )  He went on to like bacon.


My former MIL taught me how to make blini, plov, Korean carrots, kulebiaka and many other dishes which I continue to make even now.  I have introduced many people to Korean carrots and they love them!


When we would have parties with other Siberians, one of the most fun thing was to make pelmeni from scratch, getting everyone involved. Everyone loved it.


We got a mangal and shampuri and introduced to many Americans to shashlik. I still use the method my ex husband did to prepare shashlik, as each family has their special way. By the way, you can buy shampuri (spelling?) at Russian stores in the USA. Just ask them and they usually have them available.  I get vinegar at the Russian store just for shashlik and Korean carrots although I am sure I could figure out a substitute.  (Russian vinegar is HIGHLY concentrated compared to American)


I like all the soups and find them a wonderful thing to make often.
I did forget one thing, I do not like caviar/ikra at all. 

 

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