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Author Topic: My new life in the Republic of Georgia  (Read 166962 times)

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Online Faux Pas

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« Reply #850 on: May 16, 2019, 06:57:06 AM »
To answer Omega's question I'll do it through my correspondence to my new Georgian acquaintance Jaba. Jaba is married to an American woman. He wants to know how they can get to America. He didn't know he was married to his ticket to get there.


Maxx as I've been out of the business of visa for over a decade things might have changed but unlikely I'd think. There is a spousal visa she can apply for in Georgia at the US consulate, K2, K12 or something. Interviews would be at their nearest place or regional offices that conduct them. In other words they don't have to apply in the US nor would need to spend time apart

Offline ML

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« Reply #851 on: May 16, 2019, 07:50:32 AM »
Maxx, considering the drastic change the US has gone through post 911, are you glad you've permanently relocated and if so specifically why? 

I truly feel we have less freedom now than in the 90's.

Yes, Maxx was lucky to get out when he could.

Currently there is a flood of US Ciitizens trying to get out of the country, while those wanting to come into the USA has dwindled to a trickle.

I can hardly sleep at night thinking about how terrible it is to live here.
Winston Churchill.  “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.”

Offline Omega82

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« Reply #852 on: May 16, 2019, 08:29:18 PM »
Do you really think we're free here? 

Maxx it would be great to hear your comments and first hand experience how the US compares to Georgia in various aspects. 

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« Reply #853 on: May 17, 2019, 04:46:26 AM »
Maxx as I've been out of the business of visa for over a decade things might have changed but unlikely I'd think. There is a spousal visa she can apply for in Georgia at the US consulate, K2, K12 or something. Interviews would be at their nearest place or regional offices that conduct them. In other words they don't have to apply in the US nor would need to spend time apart


He doesn't want to be apart from his wife. Perhaps they could petition right here in Georgia? Only problem is she has no way to supporting him as in the Affidavit of Support the old I-864. I notice in the list I looked at they don't have that anymore. Perhaps they don't need one? Anyway back 17 years ago when I did this process a spousal visa for a wife and child (They have no children) was called a K-3 and K-4.


I am going to tell him about some of the negatives of living in the U.S. and I'll post it here.


Omega, "None are more hopelessly enslaved as those that falsely believe they are free" ~ Goeth

Offline SteveInBoston

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« Reply #854 on: May 17, 2019, 06:04:03 AM »
The K3 is not being processed anymore, apparantly.  At visajourney forums they stated only 6 K3's  were processed last year.  K3's get administratively closed and the petitioner is told to submit IR-1/CR-1.

Good news is the couple can submit IR-1/CR-1 (form I-130) as a direct consular filing in Georgia, which cuts down on the processing time significantly.  The I-864 still needs to be submitted, but perhaps his wife can contact a relative in the US who can agree to be a sponsor?


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« Reply #855 on: May 17, 2019, 09:01:30 AM »
The K3 is not being processed anymore, apparantly.  At visajourney forums they stated only 6 K3's  were processed last year.  K3's get administratively closed and the petitioner is told to submit IR-1/CR-1.

Good news is the couple can submit IR-1/CR-1 (form I-130) as a direct consular filing in Georgia, which cuts down on the processing time significantly.  The I-864 still needs to be submitted, but perhaps his wife can contact a relative in the US who can agree to be a sponsor?


Thanks for the info. I'll pass it on.


Years ago I was told by a retired District Director of the USCIS that the affidavit of support is not enforced. Do you if that is still true?

Offline ML

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« Reply #856 on: May 17, 2019, 10:01:01 AM »

Years ago I was told by a retired District Director of the USCIS that the affidavit of support is not enforced. Do you if that is still true?

Actual facts on this would be hard to come by.

But on an ad hoc basis, I have also heard that no one knows of cases where support has tried to be enforced.  Likely there is not manpower available for such.
Winston Churchill.  “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.”

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« Reply #857 on: May 17, 2019, 11:23:55 AM »

Thanks for the info. I'll pass it on.


Years ago I was told by a retired District Director of the USCIS that the affidavit of support is not enforced. Do you if that is still true?

Officially the sponsor in on the hook for any gov benefits are given to the beneficiary due to lack of support from the sponsor.  However, I wonder how many state gov. know about the stipulation of I-864 in order to enforce it.

If it is used at all, I think the most likely scenario is that the beneficiary used the I-864 to sue their partner during divorce or separation.  Just my opinion.


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« Reply #858 on: May 17, 2019, 09:38:40 PM »
Maxx, could you summarize for us the pros and cons of living in the US vs Georgia please. 

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« Reply #859 on: May 18, 2019, 01:31:05 AM »







Fish from the Black Sea I am about to prepare for cooking.


Below is letter exchange I am having with an American named Jon. He and his wife are thinking of expating here. One of the things that I find superior to the US is the food. Much more likely to be organic, less pesticides and hormone injections. The local farmers simply can't afford this. ALL the cattle are free range. And a lot of the chickens are also.




Hi Maxx,

Don't get me wrong, most of the food here is grown in either US or Mexico and some from South America in our winter time.  But the Chinese have been slowly creeping into the store shelves. I will not buy it. I mistook a frozen Salmon filet at Walmart and saw when I gothome it was processed in China so I took it back and got my moneyback.  I told them why. I am not surprised the food is better there as probably not so much pesticides and factory farms.

I asked you about the address where I saw the apartments for $14 anight.  Is that a decent area ?  They said it was in "Old Town". What is the story on public transport. I think you mentioned underground or were you talking about Tbilisi ?  What is available inBatumi ?  What about cheap car rental ? What about crime there in regards to stealing and or mugging ?

Best regards...............................Jon







You get used to things being different from the States after you live here for a while. It is the fourth segment of getting over culture shock. The honeymoon phase, the irritation phase, the rejection of the culture phase and the acceptance of the culture. I'm definitely in the last one.


Taxis are the best way to get around. They are EVERYWHERE. I was told that half the population of Tbilisi is taxi drivers. It is not uncommon and to see 4 or 5 taxis in a cluster driving down the street looking for fares. Stand on the curb and look like you need a ride and someone will see you and pull over. The cost? Very low, usually  under $5. I used to get taxis to take me to the gym that was a few miles away for 5 Lari ($1.82). So a $5 cab fare will probably get you to any place in Tbilisi. The only place where the cab drivers try to rip you is at the airport. I took a taxi one time to the airport. It was on the opposite side of town, through the city and out in the outskirts of Tbilisi. Maybe 10-15 miles away. It cost me 15 Lari ($5.45). But when I wanted a taxi ride (I took a friend to the airport) back they wanted to charge me 40 Lari ($14.55)! I laughed and told him to get here only cost me 15 Lari. He found me a taxi for 20 Lari ($7.27).


I've never used public transportation. I am not sure how I would. I would need an aid to show me what buses or marshukas (Mercedes/Dodge Sprinters) to take. I had a friend from Ireland visit me last month and I met him in Tbilisi. He used the Metro (underground subway) and was quite impressed with it. Very, very low cost. But he speaks Russian fairly well so he is able navigate his way around easier than I. There is a Metro in Tbilisi, but not in Batumi.


Speaking of Russian. It would be a good idea to learn a few sentences. Scol-ka Minn-yah means "How much for me?" and point to your destination on a map. The driver if he doesn't understand English and if you don't understand numbers in Russian (I do) will hold up a number of his fingers. If he holds up too many fingers, then just back away. There will be another cab coming along within a minute. 


I know a woman in Tbilisi that has a few places to rent. I've stayed at her place a few times. I like it because it has got nice kitchen,  comfortable beds and the best shower (STRONG water pressure) I've ever had. She charges 40 Lari a night ($14.55), $100 a week, $350 a month. Her name is Nino. Her friend and caretaker Magda lives upstairs. It is on the ground floor with its own entrance. It has got like a 2 inch step up. The outside looks like a fright as does a lot of FSU places but the inside is nice. It is actually quite big. Two single beds in the bedroom and big living room with couches and chairs. A dining room with a nice big table. A good kitchen for preparing meals. There is a nice grocery store and pharmacy called Fresco about a kilometer down the street. It is in safe neighborhood. I lived there last year from August 1st to November 15th.  When my Irish friend came to Georgia I got him and his Russian business partners a place there. They have been back to this place several times working on their business project. I could set you up there. Magda speaks good English.


But if you want a place in the old town that has its advantages. You could walk the city at night and enjoy the night life, bars and restaurants and such. Then walk back home. As long as you don't flash a lot of money around you will be safe. Georgia is much safer than America. I've read Western women who have visited here say they felt safer walking the streets in Tbilisi than they did in Europe or the US. I know, I feel that way. I've never felt threatened. Even the police here are relaxed.


Rent in Batumi during tourist season (May 1 to October 1) is generally high. You probably could find a place for $25 a night from Airbnb. But it wouldn't be one of those premium places with a view of the Black Sea. Right now I am staying at a place I rented last July for $25 a night. But because I am renting long term they agreed to $350 a month plus utilities (which will be about $50).


I've heard about the Chinese putting melamine in baby food. I used to use crucibles for melting gold. Depending on usage they would last a month or two before my needing a new one. I bought one that had been made in China. It fell apart during the first melt. I was worried when I was lifting it out of the furnace that it would fall apart and I would have tens of thousands of dollars of molten gold spill out on the floor. After it cooled I could break off pieces with my bare hand and I could crumble them into sand. So besides putting crap in our food they make some dangerous products. It is all about the money with them. A lot of fish to eat in America comes from fish farms in China. They raise those poor fish in the polluted environment of fish feces. Then got the industrial plants without environment regulations spewing mercury into the air and some of it winding up in the ponds. There is no health benefit of eating salmon from China.


The food raised in America is mostly GMO. It has 'Round Up' pesticide sprayed all over it. Monsanto is the criminal there.


« Last Edit: May 18, 2019, 01:32:56 AM by Maxx2 »

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« Reply #860 on: May 18, 2019, 05:31:46 AM »






Fish from the Black Sea I am about to prepare for cooking.



Looks like Mackerel !
No to Brexit, Yes to a People's Vote on Brexit, THEN a General Election

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« Reply #861 on: May 18, 2019, 05:35:58 AM »
Looks like Mackerel !


They taste pretty good. I ate half of the biggest one. Now I got enough cooked and refrigerated fish to last me to the end of next week.



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« Reply #862 on: May 19, 2019, 04:04:53 AM »
Maxx, could you summarize for us the pros and cons of living in the US vs Georgia please.




Hi Jaba, I hope my long letter doesn't weary you!

I hear Georgians tell me all the time how much they want to visit America. Many of them tell me their dream is to live there. My unspoken thought is, "Careful what you wish for. You just might get it."

Did you know every year about 5000 Americans give up their citizenship? The reasons are not for lack of patriotism or love of country. It is for the financial liability of being an American and living abroad. You see the government of the United States bases its tax system on citizenship and not residence. Except for one small country in Africa, American citizens are required to pay taxes on their world-wide income. Even if the citizen has been living outside the United States for years and years. They are required to file a tax document by June 15th of every year (for those living outside the US) called a "Ten-Forty" (1040). This is to report income or financial benefits they have received. They are required to report any bank accounts outside of America to the Department of the Treasury that have more than $10,000 go through them. The failure to do so is a fine from $10,000 to $100,000 per  year and 50% of the assets that are in the bank account. These burdens are not only for US Citizens they are for Green Card holders (Legal Permanent Residents).

Jaba, take your wife for example. Since she is an American if she earns any money in Georgia she is required to report this to the US government. The first 15.3% of her income and any Federal and State income taxes are to be paid to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Failure to do so is called tax evasion and it is a criminal offense. You know Chicago's infamous gangster Al Capone? Al Capone was sent to prison for tax evasion. The IRS is called the scariest agency on the planet. The IRS wanted Switzerland to turn over all the names of US citizens who had accounts in their banks. Switzerland didn't want to do it because it violated its centuries old bank secrecy laws. The IRS threatened the Swiss banks that they would seize their assets unless they turned over the names of their US banking customers. Switzerland broke its own laws and gave the IRS what they wanted.

Jaba if you were to go to the United States by a 'family based' visa (Husband of a wife who is a US Citizen) you would be pushed to get a green card. Immigrants in America will kill to get a green card. They are highly desired. Once they get a green card they do not have to worry about deportation. How you would be "pushed to get a green card" is you would get your documents to be able to work in the US by applying for a green card. Then once you get a green card you are required to pay taxes.

You mentioned your income. If you went to America and got a green card. Then decided to leave America and go back to Georgia and got the job you have now. It would be like this for you. 1000 GEL is your gross income. 784 is your net (after tax) income and you would be required to pay 153 GEL (15.3% tax) to the US government for your retirement. You would also have to pay tax to the State taxing authorities in the State you used to live in. Minnesota where I am from, the top income tax for that State is 9.85%. The top tax rate in America is 37% plus State income taxes and the retirement tax of 15.3 %. Then there are sales taxes on items you buy. If you see something marked $1000 and you want to buy it, you have to pay a tax. Most States have a sales tax around 7%. So it would cost maybe $1070 instead of just $1000. Also there are property taxes. Most home owners pay hundreds of dollars a month in property taxes. That is a tax just for the privilege of living in your own home. My cousins live in Colonial, New Jersey in average houses. They pay the city of Colonial $11,000 a year in property tax. That is close to a thousand dollars a month in tax!

Now the good thing about these taxes is, except for the 15.3 % retirement tax most of them wouldn't apply to you if you lived here in Georgia. My fear is the IRS will ask all taxing authorities world-wide to turn over their data collected on any US citizens or green card holders living in their countries.

When I set up my business I have to keep all of the above in mind. And I am NOT going to give up my US citizenship!

http://www.forbes.com/sites/robertwood/2018/12/03/americans-renouncing-citizenship-not-what-you-might-think/#7553a3f7d224
« Last Edit: May 19, 2019, 04:07:15 AM by Maxx2 »

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« Reply #863 on: May 19, 2019, 05:57:16 PM »
Maxx,

There are some inconsistencies in your post. 

First, state income tax does not apply if you have not lived in the state the entire tax year.  You have to file tax returns if you lived in a state that has income tax.  A few states do make you pay state taxes if you still own property in that state.

Second, if you live abroad for most of the year (11 months total time, iirc), then about $100,000 of your earned income is exempt from US taxes.  You still have to file the tax form, but your tax liability is $0.

If you have US retirement income, it may be taxed based on calculations, even if you live outside the US the entire tax year.

If you give up US citizenship, the IRS will automatically deduct about 25% of your Social Security retirement income for as nonresident alien tax.  I'm not sure if other retirement income sources are taxed.


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« Reply #864 on: May 19, 2019, 07:30:21 PM »
Maxx,

There are some inconsistencies in your post. 

First, state income tax does not apply if you have not lived in the state the entire tax year.  You have to file tax returns if you lived in a state that has income tax.  A few states do make you pay state taxes if you still own property in that state.

Second, if you live abroad for most of the year (11 months total time, iirc), then about $100,000 of your earned income is exempt from US taxes.  You still have to file the tax form, but your tax liability is $0.

If you have US retirement income, it may be taxed based on calculations, even if you live outside the US the entire tax year.

If you give up US citizenship, the IRS will automatically deduct about 25% of your Social Security retirement income for as nonresident alien tax.  I'm not sure if other retirement income sources are taxed.


I'm not really in the mood to get into this right now. It is a start of a new day for me (5:13  AM) and discussing US tax regulations and rules that apply to me even though I have haven't lived in the US for 2 1/2 years is a depressing way to start a day. State income taxes still apply. Best is to establish residency in a no income tax state like Texas. FICA the "payroll tax" of 15.3% applies from dollar one of gross income earned. Unless United States has a tax treaty with the country and credits you paying to their pension fund. Georgia doesn't have such a treaty, Poland for example does.


In my letter to Jaba I was warning him of the trap that many of you guys unknowingly sprung on your wives. Once they get their green cards they are hooked up to the US tax system and are required to spend money to tax professionals to keep book on themselves. This is NOT cheap.     

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« Reply #865 on: May 19, 2019, 09:26:08 PM »



I am considering going into business soon as I am about the reach full retirement age and can open a business outside the United States without forfeiting my pension.


I found this article in my research of where I will be if I go into business.





"It was Obama who pushed FATCA (Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act) that requires all foreign entities to report on anything they do with Americans outside the USA or else their assets will be confiscated in the USA. The FATCA legislation was passed into law in 2010 as part of the unrelated jobs legislation known as the HIRE law. FATCA is a broad, complex set of rules designed to increase tax compliance by Americans with financial assets held outside the United States. * Consequently, no American can have a bank account outside the USA, for banks will no longer accept the risk that an American failed to pay their taxes. Prior to FATCA, growth rates were generally greater than 6% reaching 7% in 2004 annually. Since then, the highest growth rate was 5.4% in 2018.
All countries are now hunting taxes and destroying would economic growth. The tax dispute UBS is in nowwith France will occupy them for years to come. At the end of February 2019, a Paris-based criminal court ordered UBS to pay a fine and pay 5 billion Swiss francs in damages because the big bank helped wealthy French between 2004 and 2012 to hide their money from the tax authorities. UBS has moved on. It will take years to reach a final decision. The entire Swiss secrecy policy was installed because of Hitler who made it a crime to have money outside of Germany. Hitler did not invade Switzerland nor did he have his fake court impose huge fines on Swiss banks. Today, governments no longer respect international law.


The entire direct taxation is what the Founding Fathers in the US forbid. We are now witnessing the destruction of the world economy and everyone is being hunted globally. The Common Reporting Standard (CRS) is an information standard for the automatic exchange of tax and financial information on a global level. It was put together by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) back in 2014. Its purpose was to hunt down tax evasion primarily for the European Union. They took the concept from the US Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), which imposed liabilities on foreign institutions if they did not report what Americans were doing outside the country.


The legal basis of the CRS is the Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters. As of 2016, 83 countries signed an agreement to implement it. First reporting took place in September 2017. The CRS has many loopholes, for countries have to sign the agreement. This has omitted the United States as well as most developing countries. Note that countries that are included are China, Singapore, Switzerland, most tax havens, and of course Australian/New Zealand as well as Canada.

As of 2018, the signing nations to avoid are:
Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Australia, Austria, The Bahamas, Bahrain, Belize, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, China, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Dominica, Ghana, Grenada, Hong Kong (China), Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Marshall Islands, Macao (China), Malaysia, Mauritius, Monaco, Nauru, New Zealand, Pakistan, Panama, Qatar, Russia, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Saint Marten, Switzerland, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Vanuatu."



Georgia is not in the list of CRS countries that will report on you. However that could change in the future.
* Not exactly true. Banks have been known to be reluctant to take Americans as new customers because of the reporting requirement burden. However I do have a Georgian bank account. Not much activity in it. If I used this account for my future business and more than $10,000 per year passed through it I would be required to register it with the Department of Treasury or face massive fines. It was easy for me to open a Georgian bank account probably because Georgia is not part of the CRS.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2019, 09:44:36 PM by Maxx2 »

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« Reply #866 on: May 20, 2019, 11:07:15 AM »
http://www.forbes.com/sites/robertwood/2018/12/03/americans-renouncing-citizenship-not-what-you-might-think/#7553a3f7d224

Hi maxx,

Allow me to throw caution into this wind. The main gist in this article is the supposed 'high taxation' for Americans. Written on the eve of tax reform no less.

True there's an 'x' number of 'Americans' denouncing their citizenship on an annual basis. But missing in this yearly accounting is precisely who these 'Americans' really are. While there's a good number of them are Americans such as yourself, methinks the healthier dosage are former 'foreign nationals' who, after amassing a sizeable 'wealth' working their younger days in the US, are now rooting themselves 'back' to their respective 'original nations' to live out their remaining years. Mexicans easily comes to mind. Asians, Filipinos, etc...Lot's of my employees do this throughout their years building their nest 'back home' in preparation, which includes buying/building homes, etc...Union employees are the exception. They'd be crazy if they renounced their citizenship and give up their right for their earned full pension.

So my feeling is 'no'. The article is much too sensationalized and offered no definitive data to support the assertion because its intent lies somewhere else.

Just IMO.
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« Reply #867 on: May 20, 2019, 12:05:51 PM »
maxx, I operated several businesses when I lived in Ukraine...
I managed them through offshore shell corporations located in a tax free country, I chose Isle of Man, because I like to visit and stock up on their unusual coins!!!
HSBC is a convenient offshore bank I like, where you can get accounts in Euros (recommended) and Sterling
if you do business under a shell corp and conduct the transaction in euros, the USA doesn't ever know about it
otherwise ANY over seas dollar transfer could be accessible by the IRS...
I assume Georgia's banking system is similar to Ukraine's in which case I would not hold deposits there... 
just use it to wire in some cash and receive through front window...
I don't know if Georgia will want you to account for your transfers into the country possibly for taxation purposes...

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« Reply #868 on: May 20, 2019, 11:12:01 PM »
Hi maxx,

Allow me to throw caution into this wind. The main gist in this article is the supposed 'high taxation' for Americans. Written on the eve of tax reform no less.

True there's an 'x' number of 'Americans' denouncing their citizenship on an annual basis. But missing in this yearly accounting is precisely who these 'Americans' really are. While there's a good number of them are Americans such as yourself, methinks the healthier dosage are former 'foreign nationals' who, after amassing a sizeable 'wealth' working their younger days in the US, are now rooting themselves 'back' to their respective 'original nations' to live out their remaining years. Mexicans easily comes to mind. Asians, Filipinos, etc...Lot's of my employees do this throughout their years building their nest 'back home' in preparation, which includes buying/building homes, etc...Union employees are the exception. They'd be crazy if they renounced their citizenship and give up their right for their earned full pension.

So my feeling is 'no'. The article is much too sensationalized and offered no definitive data to support the assertion because its intent lies somewhere else.

Just IMO.


Hi GQ.


You would think Forbes would be less likely to sensationalize than say Nomad Capital. Still a lot of people giving up US citizenship. There has got be a reason why. Taxes are the most likely reason why.


I'm a stickler about following the law and the spirit of the law. I don't want to worry that some government entity will clothesline me for violation of some rule, Georgian or American.


I've been preparing to possible go into a food service business for tourists. I'll start out small and see how that goes. If it goes well, I'll expand. I figure there might be an attraction for genuine American food made by a genuine American.


I bought these kitchen tools in Tbilisi last year.




 I enjoy cooking and food prep gives me something to do.


I've hosted a few parties and served my guests various dishes. People from the FSU have different pallets (is that the right word?) of taste than us Americans although McDonalds and CocaCola do well here. I've never seen maple syrup here? Maybe people would be curious enough to buy just to see how somethings tastes coming out of a tree?
« Last Edit: May 20, 2019, 11:18:00 PM by Maxx2 »

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« Reply #869 on: May 29, 2019, 11:20:06 PM »










NOT Moonstruck!


Does anyone know how to get Russian subtitles for the 1987 film 'Moonstruck'?


I am planning on having movie parties at my place. My first guests will be the family that owns the apartment I stay in. I chose Moonstruck because of the comedy, romance (It appeals to women) and the theme of opera that runs through it. The oldest daughter of the two is an opera singer at the Batumi opera. This Sunday she leaves for Italy on tour. A few days ago I downloaded a high resolution copy of this movie. Coincidentally I came home yesterday and heard her singing La Boheme which is in this movie. Anyway it would be a good to have some Russian subtitles to go with it. Russian is the predominant language in their house.



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« Reply #870 on: May 30, 2019, 12:38:56 AM »



Anon: I was looking for the Russian subtitles only. I couldn't find them on the link you sent. But thank you.

I plan on showing films in their original language but with Russian or English subtitles.

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« Reply #871 on: June 01, 2019, 04:14:59 AM »


Last night May 31st there was a knock on my door.





Inga, Irma and Joggo


My Georgian family brought me a birthday cake!
« Last Edit: June 01, 2019, 04:16:32 AM by Maxx2 »

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« Reply #872 on: June 01, 2019, 06:42:18 AM »
I have not met the brunette, but if she is anything like her sister and Ma... Lovely family

You are a lucky chap, Maxx
No to Brexit, Yes to a People's Vote on Brexit, THEN a General Election

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« Reply #873 on: June 01, 2019, 08:26:02 AM »

Last night May 31st there was a knock on my door.


Inga, Irma and Joggo


My Georgian family brought me a birthday cake!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY! 

 :applause: :applause: :applause:

Any significance in two candles?  I realize the cake would be a fire hazard if it had a candle for each year.   ;)   Maybe two is just the way it is. 

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« Reply #874 on: June 01, 2019, 08:50:05 AM »

Happy Birthday Maxx! I'm probably like you and expect nothing for my birthday but it's great when people remember and surprise you.
There are people that will pass info about you and your family. Do not share info about yourself or share photos as they can search for you on the internet and distribute what they found since they are allowed to participate here.

 

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