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Author Topic: Retirement in Ukraine  (Read 12054 times)

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Offline artisan5308

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #25 on: December 08, 2011, 10:28:43 PM »
Yeah, I'd be nervous about the healthcare.

I can speak for my fiance and say that if it were her choice whether I lived with her in Ukraine or she with me in the States, she'd have me there in a heartbeat.

Doug, sounds like your almost there already bud. Go with your heart and be mindful of the SS issues. Any friends in Kiev you can visit once a month?
It aint what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just aint so.......Mark Twain

Online calmissile

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #26 on: December 08, 2011, 10:54:18 PM »
artisan5308,


I can speak for my fiance and say that if it were her choice whether I lived with her in Ukraine or she with me in the States, she'd have me there in a heartbeat.

Yes, some folks just don't get it.  I have met a lot of (US) guys that would move to Ukraine (or Russia) if they could take their US paycheck with them.  That's why we are staying in the states until I quit working in my consulting business.  Spending summers in Ukraine will have to do for a while.  It will also give my wife and daughter a chance to experience America.  We anticipate keeping both our homes so can go back and forth if we wish.

Contrary to the post upthread, you can receive your Social Security in Ukraine but there are some conditions that you must adhere to.  I spent an hour or so in the SS office yesterday getting a clarificaton on the issue.  And yes, I do have a friend that owns a flat in Kiev, but don't plan on going that route.  Actually there are a number of options to solve the problem.

The medical care is an issue that I will find a solution to, even for just the summer vacations.
Doug (Calmissile)

Offline Ade

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #27 on: December 08, 2011, 11:38:29 PM »
artisan5308,


I can speak for my fiance and say that if it were her choice whether I lived with her in Ukraine or she with me in the States, she'd have me there in a heartbeat.

Yes, some folks just don't get it.  I have met a lot of (US) guys that would move to Ukraine (or Russia) if they could take their US paycheck with them.  That's why we are staying in the states until I quit working in my consulting business.  Spending summers in Ukraine will have to do for a while.  It will also give my wife and daughter a chance to experience America.  We anticipate keeping both our homes so can go back and forth if we wish.

Contrary to the post upthread, you can receive your Social Security in Ukraine but there are some conditions that you must adhere to.  I spent an hour or so in the SS office yesterday getting a clarificaton on the issue.  And yes, I do have a friend that owns a flat in Kiev, but don't plan on going that route.  Actually there are a number of options to solve the problem.

The medical care is an issue that I will find a solution to, even for just the summer vacations.

So, basically, you'll not be uprooting and moving there, you'll just be having an extended vacation there every summer? Then, quite frankly, it's not much of a big deal. I'd just be realistic on the health care aspects as you are getting on a bit; yes, yes, you're fit and healthy and all of that now but, at almost 70, that can turn around in a heartbeat.

Personally, I think you'd be a little nuts considering moving there full time. Do a pro/con list of staying in the US full time compared to Ukraine; I just don't see the attraction. There is nothing on your list that can't be had in the US or close by except your inlaws and those can be visited whenever you want.



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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #27 on: December 08, 2011, 11:38:29 PM »

Offline Manny

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #28 on: December 09, 2011, 02:38:11 AM »
The medical care is an issue that I will find a solution to, even for just the summer vacations.

A flight to Germany would be my preferred healthcare option.

Not so much now, but ten years ago, expats in Estonia remained permanently poised to hop in the helicopter taxi to Finland in a medical emergency.
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Offline LiveFromUkraine

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #29 on: December 09, 2011, 05:50:45 AM »
but best try to remain objective and not look at this through rose colored glasses.

ML,

How long have you lived in Ukraine, or even visited?

I lived in Ukraine for a year and a half. Yeah, you are looking at this with rose colored glasses.  I have read your responses on both boards.  I just don't post on the other one and sometimes post here.  You got some great advice from Andrew and shrugged it off as him not knowing anything. 

Well, I have to say you are the one that doesn't understand much and when the stuff hits the fan you will learn the hard way.

I would never live in Ukraine at your age.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2011, 05:53:27 AM by LiveFromUkraine »

Offline Muzh

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #30 on: December 09, 2011, 06:53:43 AM »
Muzh,

How long has it been since you spent any significant time in Ukraine?  I am wondering if times have changed or if I just had different experiences.  Your comments about some chicks thinking you are coming on to them was true in some cases but not often.  In most cases they were happy to assist.  The guys there are truly a different animal and I agree, not friendly at all.

Hopefully the current younger generation will be in the positions to assist foreigners as most of them seem to be taking English classes in public schools.

Doug, I was there this past summer. And prior to that the previous summer for 4 weeks.
 
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Offline Muzh

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #31 on: December 09, 2011, 07:04:24 AM »
A flight to Germany would be my preferred healthcare option.

Not so much now, but ten years ago, expats in Estonia remained permanently poised to hop in the helicopter taxi to Finland in a medical emergency.

 
True that. My health insurance, United Healthcare (until I die) does this; covers the flight and hospital care to Germany (if I'm in UA) in case of emergency. I believe other insurances will cover that.
 
"Mr Putin is discovering that global finance is more frightened of the US Securities and Exchange Commission than Russian T90 tanks."

Offline Eduard

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #32 on: December 09, 2011, 07:34:12 AM »
Ade,

1.  A quieter, more simple life.  Out of the hustle and bustle of the big city.
2.  Much more friendly people, and closer ties to neighbors.
3.  A new adventure in a different country/culture.
4.  Closer ties to my wifes family.
5.  Enjoyment of raising ones own food on the farm.
6.  No economic worries.

It also does not necessarily mean permanent retirement either.  We have homes in both the US and Ukraine, so it isn't a situation that has to be permanent.  We could, and in fact might just live in Ukraine to enjoy the summers on the Sea of Azov.

What I really want to find out is how people like living in Ukraine that have (had) other options and chose Ukraine to live in.  I did not find it anything like some of the negative comments I have heard.  I guess it all depends on what you want.
Doug, I'd like to chip in, hoping you will find this helpful:


1.  A quieter, more simple life.  Out of the hustle and bustle of the big city.

you can have this in so many places in the US and have a much better quality of life.


2.  Much more friendly people, and closer ties to neighbors.

Doug, I think this assumption comes from you not knowing the culture or understanding the language. Frankly, I don't think you'll find people friendlier than the USAians anywhere in the world. Off course it's a generalisation and there are all kinds of people, good and bad in both countries. Neighbours can be good or bad in either country. Being an American you are a bit of a novelty for local people therefor you are getting a special treatment and they seem friendlier than Americans to you. Fact is it's much more of a "user culture" in Ukraine and generally people are more likely to use and take advantage of other people when they are given the opportunity. I guess it's that third world mentality in a way.
On the other hand if you are lucky enough to be surrounded by kind, genuine people with good connections your life could be nice there. But same goes for the US...  ;)  I guess it's a universal thing, no matter where you live - if you have good friends and good connections your quality of life will be much better that if you don't. Since you don't speak Russian, seems to me it would be easier for you to surround yourself with the right people in your own country.


3.  A new adventure in a different country/culture.

Can't argue with this one.


4.  Closer ties to my wifes family.

Sure.


5.  Enjoyment of raising ones own food on the farm.

You can do this in the US, I'm doing it when time permits and enjoying it very much. I have no idea why you would have to move to Ukraine for this one.



6.  No economic worries.

This really depends on many different things. Although life is cheaper there, you might spend a lot more trying to get decent medical help by having to go outside of Ukraine for that. The worst thing you can do is to trust Ukrainian health care. You might go into a hospital with a minor illness but come out with a major disability. At your age decent healthcare system should me a major consideration IMO.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2011, 07:36:11 AM by Eduard »

Offline Jack

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #33 on: December 09, 2011, 08:12:09 AM »
2.  Much more friendly people, and closer ties to neighbors.


2.  Much more friendly people, and closer ties to neighbors.

Doug, I think this assumption comes from you not knowing the culture or understanding the language.


Doug, in my opinion you are 100% correct.  As someone who has spent a lot of time in America and in Ukraine I could not agree more with you that, again in my opinion, the overall population of Ukraine is much more friendlier than what I have experienced in America. Yes, there are some rude people in Ukraine but no where near the numbers I see in America.  And I believe most Ukrainians are closer to there neighbors than American's are.  I know both culture's Doug and although I do not speak Ukrainian one does not have to understand the language to see and feel the most obvious.


ML, you say that it is questionable as to if Ukrainian's are more friendly than American's.  May I ask what is your experience in dealing with Ukrainians to make this assumption and how much time you have spent in Ukraine to base this assumption?

Online tfcrew

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #34 on: December 09, 2011, 08:53:04 AM »
tfcrew,

I am not sure I undestand your question.

  If you own your own home in Ukraine you can live on very modest income (US Social Security, etc.)  Retirement income on top of that is gravy.

As it was..I didn't really understand your post.
'Retirement in Ukraine'. Wasn't sure if it meant retirement to Ukraine [what you are considering?] or retirement from Ukraine as there are people there who have benefits from working there.


Do you collect Social Security?
I'll tell you what..the US Gov't does not direct deposit these funds in some Ukrainian bank...they just don't have that.
Unless it has changed recently...Social Security will not send the check to Ukraine.
Quote
Social Security restrictions  Social Security  restrictions prohibit sending payments to individuals in Cambodia, Vietnam  or areas that were in the former Soviet Union (other than Armenia, Estonia,  Latvia, Lithuania and Russia). Generally, you cannot  receive payments while you are in one of these countries, and we cannot send  your payments to anyone for you. However, exceptions can be made for certain  eligible beneficiaries in countries with Social Security restrictions in place.

http://ssa.gov/pubs/10137.html#countries


 


Online Turboguy

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #35 on: December 09, 2011, 08:56:24 AM »
Would it not be possible to have the SS deposited to a bank in the USA and then draw the funds in Ukraine.   My SS is directly deposted to a Money Market fund which I can transfer online to my checking account and access that through a debit card.  I don't see any reason the same could not be done with someone living in Ukraine.

Online JohnDearGreen

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #36 on: December 09, 2011, 08:57:18 AM »
I am starting this thread to hear from Americans and others that have migrated to Ukraine for retirement.  Would like to get opinions from those actually living in Ukraine as to the monthly costs, relative enjoyment of life while living there and the downsides, if any.
I would agree Ukraine is not a good choice.  Have you considered other cities in eastern Europe where conditions are a little more stable?  Like Sofia, Poland, Bratislava, etc?
You can read about life in other cities here: http://www.internations.org/


You might want to read articles like this before you own property in Ukraine:
http://www.kyivpost.com/news/nation/detail/50336/print/
« Last Edit: December 09, 2011, 09:18:46 AM by JohnDearGreen »
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Offline Eduard

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #37 on: December 09, 2011, 09:58:12 AM »
the overall population of Ukraine is much more friendlier than what I have experienced in America. Yes, there are some rude people in Ukraine but no where near the numbers I see in America.
I speak Russian and English and am fluent in both languages so my assessment of the two cultures might be a bit more realistic. I'm a social person and talk to many people in my travels. We chat about politics in Ukraine, world politics, life in Ukraine, life in the USA, life in general, etc. so I have a pretty good understanding of what the common folk in Ukraine thinks and lives, not to mention that I have friends and family there.

The fact that people in America are not as friendly to you and more rude to you than in Ukraine is very interesting. Afterall, Americans can understand you perfectly. What do you think the reason for that is?
In my experience any one who came to live in the USA from another country, not just the FSU but even Western European countries will tell you that Americans are generally much friendlier and polite people than anywhere else. Ask any Ukrainians who live in the USA what they think.

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #37 on: December 09, 2011, 09:58:12 AM »

Offline Jack

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #38 on: December 09, 2011, 10:14:22 AM »
I am also a very social person and talk to many people in America, Russia and Ukraine.  We chat politics in Ukraine, we talk about world politics in Ukraine, we talk about life in America and Ukraine and I have done so in Ukraine going back to 1998. I have a pretty good understanding of what the common people and the not so common people in Ukraine think and live. I have both family and many friends who live in Ukraine. The difference between the two cultures as as different as day is to night.

I do have business interest in Ukraine and have been extremely successful with that business in Ukraine. I can and do contribute some of that success to my understanding of the Ukraine people, it culture and proud history. 

The fact that Ukraine people are more rude that American's to you to me say's a lot.  I know many American men who also think and feel that Ukrainians are more friendly than American's.   I know many Ukraine ladies in America today who also see many good aspects of Ukraine culture and it's people when compared to many, not all, but many American's.

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #39 on: December 09, 2011, 10:37:20 AM »
I am also a very social person and talk to many people in America, Russia and Ukraine.  We chat politics in Ukraine, we talk about world politics in Ukraine, we talk about life in America and Ukraine and I have done so in Ukraine going back to 1998. I have a pretty good understanding of what the common people and the not so common people in Ukraine think and live. I have both family and many friends who live in Ukraine. The difference between the two cultures as as different as day is to night.

I do have business interest in Ukraine and have been extremely successful with that business in Ukraine. I can and do contribute some of that success to my understanding of the Ukraine people, it culture and proud history. 

The fact that Ukraine people are more rude that American's to you to me say's a lot.  I know many American men who also think and feel that Ukrainians are more friendly than American's.   I know many Ukraine ladies in America today who also see many good aspects of Ukraine culture and it's people when compared to many, not all, but many American's.
I never said that people in Ukraine are more rude to me, you are putting words in my mouth again, jack.
I could say exactly the same about you - you speak English and was born and raised in the USA, yet you find that Americans are unfriendly and rude to you. What's wrong with this picture? This may say more about you as a person than the Americans in general. Normally people are pretty nice to me and treat me well in both countries.


I was simply comparing the two cultures. Unlike you, I speak both languages and can have a conversation with people. Also I observe how people treat each other in different situations in the USA versus Ukraine. You can't understand what they are saying in Ukraine, but I can and that's the difference. I'm sorry that you can't see that knowing the local language gives you an advantage in understanding the local culture.


You want to prove that you know better? Fine, you da man! I have no interest in participating in another silly pissing contest with you. I was just trying to help Doug.

Offline GQBlues

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #40 on: December 09, 2011, 11:09:22 AM »
CaMissille-
 
I'm very familiar with Redlands as I built more than a few tracts in and around the area. Matter of fact, I just finished renovating a huge central distribution warehouse for a nationally reknowned retailer chain in Mira Loma not too long ago.

But reading some of the reasons you stated as the cause of your contemplation, you didn't really specify as money being an issue, and considering you have homes on both fronts, I'm wondering why can't Idyllwild, Temecula, or heck, even Lake Arrowhead be considered as viable places to suit your list? You'll easily meet all your criteria in those serene beautiful locales. While those places may in fact demand costlier properties, but the way the RE market is today, it may be worth a peek for you.
 
Without offending anyone from Ukraine, as I agree it is a beautiful country - but as most places in the FSU, Ukraine isn't exactly society friendly to seniors and handicapped peoples. That alone, I believe, should play a huge consideration on your part.

At the very least, wait a good while until this silly global economic shakedown simmer a bit. Ripple effects always cause greater disturbances in places farthest from center.
 
http://money.msn.com/investment-advice/the-3-big-crises-of-2012-jubak.aspx?page=2
 
You're going to do what you ultimately want to do, but the fact you laid this out for public consumption, I assume you're not averse in hearing some counter points, no?
 
Get your RED on !

Offline Jack

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #41 on: December 09, 2011, 12:03:48 PM »
Here are your exact words eduard,..


Americans are generally much friendlier and polite people than anywhere else. Ask any Ukrainians who live in the USA what they think.


You ARE saying that American's are more friendlier than Ukrainians eduard, and you emphasis that by saying ask any Ukrainian living in the USA what they think.

Well eduard, I have talked to many Ukraine women in America, many Ukraine women who are happily married, many of these Ukraine women live within 50 miles of me and I am able to see and speak with quite often but there are many Ukraine women who live across America who have expressed the same feelings, that so many more American people are just plain rude. And I see this as well.

I was also comparing the two cultures eduard. You see eduard, their are so many Ukraine people who speak good English that it is easy to have conversations with them to get a good understanding as to what is going on in Ukraine and what Ukrainian's are thinking. And by and large eduard, most of these individuals are educated people.

You want to tell Doug that because he does not speak the language he really can't get a good feel for the culture or people but you are wrong eduard in that one does not have to speak the Ukraine language when one can speak with so many Ukrainian's who have a good grasp of English.   Now, for those who have a hidden agenda in that they really need to speak the Ukraine language, or hire someone who does, I can see why you are saying this to Doug.

« Last Edit: December 09, 2011, 12:06:15 PM by Jack »

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #42 on: December 09, 2011, 12:11:54 PM »
Would it not be possible to have the SS deposited to a bank in the USA and then draw the funds in Ukraine.   My SS is directly deposited to a Money Market fund which I can transfer online to my checking account and access that through a debit card.  I don't see any reason the same could not be done with someone living in Ukraine.
I don't know about money market or checking accounts in Ukraine.
Credit cards are used...but concerning  the cost of cash withdrawl I am not sure.

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #43 on: December 09, 2011, 12:29:10 PM »
Would it not be possible to have the SS deposited to a bank in the USA and then draw the funds in Ukraine.   My SS is directly deposted to a Money Market fund which I can transfer online to my checking account and access that through a debit card.  I don't see any reason the same could not be done with someone living in Ukraine.

Turbo, here are the critical parts of the SS post:

"restrictions prohibit sending payments to individuals in . . . areas that were in the former Soviet Union . . . Generally, you cannot  receive payments while you are in one of these countries . . . "

So, yes, you can continue to get your SS deposited into your USA bank while living in Ukraine . . . and yes, you will be in violation of the prohibition against doing so.  Will you get caught and will there be consequences?  It will be somewhat like the situation of cheating on your income taxes; maybe yes, maybe no.

I know a man who did get caught.  SS sent him some standard form to his home address in USA.  Letter was returned to SS by postal service with note . . . address no longer valid.  Shortly thereafter, SS stopped the auto deposit to his bank account.  He missed about 11 SS checks until he was back in USA and filled out a thousand documents.  He is still appealing trying to get back the 11 missed monthly payments.

So what is  the reason for this rule?  As I understand it, it is due to the corruption in Ukraine and other countries on the 'bad list.'  That is to say, our SS people do not feel comfortable that the money will always get to our citizens in those countries and that there will be a lack of reporting deaths so that payments continue after death, etc., etc., etc.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2011, 12:39:48 PM by ML »
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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #44 on: December 09, 2011, 12:41:04 PM »
Doug:
 
There is this story told to many American tourists travelling to the Caribbean.
 
 
Once there were four friends that were always together; partying, drinking, playing cards, etc. One day during a storm, lightning struck the corner where our friends hang out and were killed instantly.
 
One of them opened his eyes and finds himself in front of St. Peter and the Pearly gates.
"Welcome, son" said St. P The guy looked around and asked St. P where are his friends. St. P looks sadly to the guy and just shakes his head.
 
"You mean, they went....?"
 
"Yes, they went down there." said St. P
 
Resigned our hero took his wings and walked into heaven. After an eternity or two, our hero feels bored; something's missing. He says "I wonder if..." and he goes to see St. P
 
"Hi Mr. P, do you think I can visit my friends, you know, down there?"
 
"This is a very unusual request. I'll have to set an appointment with the boss." said St. P.
 
After another eternity St. P finds our friend and brings him over to see the boss.
 
"Hey God, is it possible I can see my buddies, er..., down there? I really miss them and would like to see how they are doing."
 
God looks at our hero and says "I'll give you two weeks to visit your friends and then you have to come back. If you go back again, you'll have to stay there."
 
"Sweet" and off, he tooks his wings and blasted down to hell. As the gates of hell open, his jaw drops to the floor. Huge party. Lots of booze, girls, gambling, decadence and debauchery. As he makes the turn, standing at their usual corner are his buddies. It was a reunion full of tears as they embraced and exchaneged stories. For the next two weeks they party as there is no tomorrow. Once the two weks are over, our hero says goodbye to his buddies and zooms back to heaven.
 
Eventually, after an eternity or two, he cannot tolerate all this peace and quiet and makes an appointment with the boss.
 
"God, I thought it over and my friends are there. Also, I had such a great time that I believe I can have a better life there than I can have here."
 
God tells him "Very well, you made your choice. Remember, you cannot return here." And with that said, our hero takes off his wings and zooms back to hell.
 
When the gates of hell open, his jaw dropped to the floor. Scenes of people burning at the stake, others with their heads encrusted in the pavement while being tickled mercilessly on their feet.
 
Pain.
 
Suffering.
 
Everywhere he looked.
 
Desperately he goes looking for his friends and finds them, heads encrusted in the sidewalk of the same corner they used to hang out.
 
"Friends. Buddies. What is going on? Where are the girls? Where is the booze? Where's the fun? It was not like this the last time I was here!" he asked.
 
One of his buddies gets his head off the concrete and says "Ah yes. Last time you were a tourist."
"Mr Putin is discovering that global finance is more frightened of the US Securities and Exchange Commission than Russian T90 tanks."

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #45 on: December 09, 2011, 12:46:36 PM »
Here are your exact words eduard,..


Americans are generally much friendlier and polite people than anywhere else. Ask any Ukrainians who live in the USA what they think.


You ARE saying that American's are more friendlier than Ukrainians eduard, and you emphasis that by saying ask any Ukrainian living in the USA what they think.

Well eduard, I have talked to many Ukraine women in America, many Ukraine women who are happily married, many of these Ukraine women live within 50 miles of me and I am able to see and speak with quite often but there are many Ukraine women who live across America who have expressed the same feelings, that so many more American people are just plain rude. And I see this as well.

I was also comparing the two cultures eduard. You see eduard, their are so many Ukraine people who speak good English that it is easy to have conversations with them to get a good understanding as to what is going on in Ukraine and what Ukrainian's are thinking. And by and large eduard, most of these individuals are educated people.

You want to tell Doug that because he does not speak the language he really can't get a good feel for the culture or people but you are wrong eduard in that one does not have to speak the Ukraine language when one can speak with so many Ukrainian's who have a good grasp of English.   Now, for those who have a hidden agenda in that they really need to speak the Ukraine language, or hire someone who does, I can see why you are saying this to Doug.
I don't need to sell anything to Doug, he was already my client. Grow up, jack. I thought that service providers weren't supposed to talk to each other any more? Why do you need to continue starting these pissing matches even after you were told by the admin not to do that? You think that people are so stupid that you must tell them that you, jack know better? Give them some credit, they will figure things out.

Offline Ade

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #46 on: December 09, 2011, 01:00:58 PM »
I don't need to sell anything to Doug, he was already my client. Grow up, jack. I thought that service providers weren't supposed to talk to each other any more? Why do you need to continue starting these pissing matches even after you were told by the admin not to do that? You think that people are so stupid that you must tell them that you, jack know better? Give them some credit, they will figure things out.

Just ignore him.

Personally, I couldn't care less which of you is right, which of you provides the better service or which of you speaks the language. I do care that your back and forth bickering between each other has polluted several forums.

Come on, grow up and just ignore him. I know that's too much to ask Jack, but at least if you do, you'll look the better man.

Offline chivo

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #47 on: December 09, 2011, 01:41:57 PM »
To the OP.
 
I remember when I was thinking about moving to these parts. All my friends in America thought I was crazy. All my Russian friends, and I had a few before I moved here, thought I was crazy too.
 
Only one person out of all that knew thought I was doing the right thing or said anything positive about it. Some knew what was here, others didn't have a clue. I knew though that I had to follow my heart and do what I thought was in my best interest. It's my life and if everybody else thought I was crazy so be it.
 
I have no doubt now that I made the right choice. I would do it again in a heartbeat. It may not be what others would do or want, but I know that it's right for me. And that's the bottom line.
 
There will always be naysayers. They will spout their experiences as "your" facts even when then don't walk in your shoes. They will put fear into your head, lord knows for whatever reason and comment as if they see your life as you do.
 
I came many times to Russia before I finally moved here. I've lived in 2 other cities besides Moscow and each place was more than livable even if others would never live there. I knew what I was getting myself into and I was all right with it. Yes, health issues and what to do about them was a concern, no question.
 
For me it has been maybe the best decision I have ever made and followed through on.
 
I am not here to tell you to do one thing or the other. You have been to Ukraine enough to know what is going on there. You have seen your life there and you seem OK with it. Actually more than OK with it. You know whether or not it can be done on your end and you are an age where you can weigh the facts and make an honest assessment of the situation.
 
If it's strictly to make your wife happy, then you do what you have to. If it's a matter of following your heart, it's your life and it's the only one you get. I say follow your heart.
 
 

Russian Women Discussion

Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #47 on: December 09, 2011, 01:41:57 PM »

Offline Jack

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #48 on: December 09, 2011, 02:05:57 PM »

I thought that service providers weren't supposed to talk to each other any more?



eduard, I thought Service Providers were not suppose to include anything about there business in the signature line or avatar, did you not read what Dan wrote you? 

Look at our two profiles and avatars eduard.  Which one of us is capable of following the rules and guidelines we were instructed to follow?

I guess you are above all other service providers and can include a link to your site and promotion of your business although you were advised it was against the TOS of this discussion forum.  What do you have to say about that eduard?


As far as growing up eduard it is you who is always writing if you cannot speak the language you will not be successful. Well, if guy's only met ladies who did not speak English you might be correct but as it is eduard MANY Russian and Ukraine ladies speak English and as such the man and woman DO share a common language and do not need a third person to be part of there courtship.


Offline Ade

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Re: Retirement in Ukraine
« Reply #49 on: December 09, 2011, 02:10:53 PM »
Can't the mods ban one of these guys and be done with it?

 

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