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Author Topic: FOR HISTORY BUFFS  (Read 33799 times)

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Offline SANDRO43

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #125 on: October 03, 2018, 06:24:27 PM »
FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY CONFIRMS HISTORICAL DATA



St. Ambrose - The Crypt- The Cathedral

The well-preserved remains of St. Ambrose (339/340–397 AD), bishop of Milan in 374 and later its patron saint, were examined by a forensic team who were able to confirm what was hitherto known: smallish stature (1.68 cm) and an improperly reset right collarbone fracture, of which he often complained and what probably caused his slight facial asymmetry.

Bishop Ambrose was responsible for the search and discovery of the buried remains of Saints Gervasius and Protasius - brother Christian martyrs in the 3rd century AD - also kept in Milan's Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio: their examination revealed a tall stature (1.80 cm) for the time, probably twins who died from being beheaded and whipped, respectively, possibly in Diocletian's times.

Bishop Ambrose asked to be laid beside them upon his death.

   
« Last Edit: October 03, 2018, 06:31:38 PM by SANDRO43 »
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Offline SANDRO43

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #126 on: October 05, 2018, 07:18:51 PM »
The BentProp Project

In 1993 Dr. Patrick Scannon was vacationing in a Micronesian island when at low tide he noticed a bent propeller sticking out of the sand bottom: it was what remained of a B-24 bomber some 50 years after WWII.

This led him to create with several volunteers a project (http://bentprop.org) to search for similar remains around the world, and to report their findings to the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, and eventually the families involved. 

Their most recent discovery a few days ago were 4 USAAF bombers (an A-20 Havoc, a B-25 Mitchell, a B-26 Marauder, a B-24 Liberator) in the Thyrrenian Sea off the Tuscan promontory of Mount Argentario, with the remains of 17 aircrew.

Milan's "Duomo"

Offline BdHvA

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #127 on: October 05, 2018, 07:20:20 PM »
In Turin a chapel has been reopened. Curious to hear Sandro's opinion.

http://news.artnet.com/art-world/chapel-holy-shroud-reopens-1358287
Experierence is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you. A. Huxley

Offline SANDRO43

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #128 on: October 05, 2018, 07:25:35 PM »
In Turin a chapel has been reopened. Curious to hear Sandro's opinion.
A well-known site here, hosting a most holy relic of debated authenticity: the shroud supposedly used to wrap Christ's deposed body after his crucifixion.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2018, 07:33:16 PM by SANDRO43 »
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Offline SANDRO43

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #129 on: October 13, 2018, 06:00:10 PM »
400 Murales in 50 years

Pinuccio Sciola is a Sardinian artist known for his "singing stones":


He hails from the small farming village of San Sperate, and in 1968 he convinced his fellow inhabitants - about 3,000 then - to apply lime to their house walls and invite other artists to paint them however they liked.

After 50 years, this unique open-air museum boasts 400+ murales obtained with various technique, contributed by national and international artists.


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Offline BdHvA

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #130 on: October 29, 2018, 06:26:47 PM »
Not sure there is a weather thread on RWD but both Italy and Iberia have faced very heavy weather in the last week or so. Think BIG tornado's, mega hail storms, flash floods and 3 foot snow falls in an afternoon.

How are the locals doing Sandro?
Experierence is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you. A. Huxley

Offline SANDRO43

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #131 on: October 30, 2018, 08:59:51 AM »
Not sure there is a weather thread on RWD
"Global Warming"?
Quote
How are the locals doing Sandro?
Coping :(. We have faced worse in the past (e.g. Florence in 1966), and our Fire Brigades are doing a great job :).


 
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Offline SANDRO43

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SAUCY FRESCO AT POMPEI
« Reply #132 on: November 20, 2018, 04:20:24 PM »
New interesting items are continuing to be discovered under the ashes of Pompei.

This time what appeared is part of a depiction of the myth of Leda, Queen of Sparta seduced, along with his husband Tyndareus, by an as yet uncovered Zeus in the guise of a swan, producing 4 eggs which unhatched into Castor, Pollux (the Polydeuces or Dioscuri), Helen wife of Spartan King Menelaus then of Paris of Troy and Clitemnestra, wife of Agamemnon, King of Mycenae and leader of the Achaian expedition against Troy, as narrated by Homer in his epic Iliad.

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Offline krimster2

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #133 on: November 20, 2018, 05:07:39 PM »
I wonder what archeologists 2,000 yr from now will find interesting about our era?
a plastic Ronald McDonald?

maybe the dead should remain buried?
for if we disturb their world
they may in turn disturb ours
so give some thought
to what lies beneath
the soil you tread upon
for dead men do tell tales


pic is of Roman era glass and ceramics I found in Chersonese, Crimea after a big storm eroded the side of a hill
excavated by my oldest daughter!

« Last Edit: November 20, 2018, 05:20:51 PM by krimster2 »

Online jone

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Re: SAUCY FRESCO AT POMPEI
« Reply #134 on: November 20, 2018, 06:23:09 PM »
New interesting items are continuing to be discovered under the ashes of Pompei.

This time what appeared is part of a depiction of the myth of Leda, Queen of Sparta seduced, along with his husband Tyndareus, by an as yet uncovered Zeus in the guise of a swan, producing 4 eggs which unhatched into Castor, Pollux (the Polydeuces or Dioscuri), Helen wife of Spartan King Menelaus then of Paris of Troy and Clitemnestra, wife of Agamemnon, King of Mycenae and leader of the Achaian expedition against Troy, as narrated by Homer in his epic Iliad.


I had the chance to see the artifacts and re-created rooms of Pompei when the exhibit was in Los Angeles.  One of the more prominent exhibits was the house of ill repute.  It was interesting to see how much emphasis was placed on sexual promiscuity in ancient times. 

Of great interest to me, however, was the plaster replicas of the people who had suffered death and their final poses brought into the present time.
Kissing girls is a goodness.  It beats the hell out of card games.  - Robert Heinlein

Offline SANDRO43

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Re: SAUCY FRESCO AT POMPEI
« Reply #135 on: November 21, 2018, 08:06:43 AM »
I had the chance to see the artifacts and re-created rooms of Pompei when the exhibit was in Los Angeles.  One of the more prominent exhibits was the house of ill repute.  It was interesting to see how much emphasis was placed on sexual promiscuity in ancient times.
Not altogether surprising, since the "House of ill repute" was a lupanar (brothel) ;).


Maybe some customers needed a hint ;).
« Last Edit: November 21, 2018, 08:09:29 AM by SANDRO43 »
Milan's "Duomo"

Offline SANDRO43

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NEW VERSION OF MY NAUTICAL GLOSSARY
« Reply #136 on: November 29, 2018, 05:46:49 PM »
The two previous versions of my Nautical Glossary are in alphabetical sequence, on a single page or on multiple pages.

While consulting other online Glossaries, I often felt that I wished their entries were grouped by major subjects. Why complain? I therefore decided to create a new version soddisfying those criteria:


Its main areas are:

- Naval Personnel
- Naval Activities
- Ships, Vessels & Boats
- Navigation
- Ship Components & Accessories
- Marine Environment
- Geography & History
- Miscellaneous

each with several subtopics except the last one, where I put a few terms that were difficult to fit anywhere else.

Enjoy, if you are interest in the subject ;D.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2018, 05:56:39 PM by SANDRO43 »
Milan's "Duomo"

Offline SANDRO43

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LEONARDO
« Reply #137 on: January 26, 2019, 07:03:56 PM »
LEONARDO DA VINCI
(1452 – 1519)


We are celebrating the 500th anniversary of Leonardo's end of a life and work spent in various Italian cities, some 20+ years in Milan in the service of its Duke Ludovico Maria Sforza il Moro where he completed one of his most famous works, L'ultima cena:


Ludovico il Moro - The Last Supper

Restorations under way in Milan's Castello Sforzesco uncovered last year in its Sala delle Asse (Hall of Boards) what appear to be Leonardo's carton marks for a fresco that was never completed, or was superimposed by a later work, itself then covered by a lime layer.


Castello Sforzesco - La Sala delle Asse

Cartons were the paper sheets employed by Renaissance painters to outline the figures and landscape they would subsequently paint, after pricking their contours and pencilling carbon marks through them as a guide for them and their disciples/helpers.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2019, 07:13:05 PM by SANDRO43 »
Milan's "Duomo"

Offline SANDRO43

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LEATHERNECK
« Reply #138 on: February 05, 2019, 09:12:53 PM »
LEATHERNECK

I had always assumed that the nickname applied to US Marines only. I just discovered that it originated earlier for Royal Marines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leatherneck), in consideration of the stiff leather neck "stock" they wore, more as a means to keep their posture erect than as a neck protection from enemy slashes.

I added it to my Nautical Glossary (http://www.floriani.it/Glossary/NauticalGlossary-eng.htm), now boasting 920 terms (804 illustrated) ;D.
Milan's "Duomo"

Offline SANDRO43

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WHO INVENTED WHEEL TYRES?
« Reply #139 on: March 29, 2019, 07:40:56 PM »
The Ancient Egyptians, apparently ;D.

The undergoing restoration of Tutankhamon (1341-1323 BC)'s chariot


has revealed that its wheel rims were lined with a thin layer of cow muscle (black above), probably to ensure a smoother ride for the divine Pharaoh. Thereafter, wooden wheels at most had a metal strip lining to reduce wear rather than enhance riding comfort. Latex rubber lining came much later, say after 2,000+ years.

The chariot axles also had the forerunners of bearings: animal fat-lubricated hardwood inside softwood, possibly to reduce their squeaky noise.

The chariot will be among the 5.400 Tutankhamon exhibits in Cairo's new Grand Egyptian Museum at Giza, now under completion and to be opened in 2020.

« Last Edit: March 29, 2019, 07:54:35 PM by SANDRO43 »
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Offline msmob

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Re: WHO INVENTED WHEEL TYRES?
« Reply #140 on: March 29, 2019, 09:51:20 PM »
The Ancient Egyptians, apparently ;D.

Not the Assyrians ?  THEY invented the War Chariots that conquered much of Egypt and they ruled for 300 years ..

NB it really is a question .. My 'history' of that time is 'learnt' from reading Wilbur Smith novels ..

« Last Edit: March 29, 2019, 09:53:22 PM by msmob »
No to Brexit, Yes to a People's Vote on Brexit, THEN a General Election

Offline SANDRO43

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Re: WHO INVENTED WHEEL TYRES?
« Reply #141 on: March 30, 2019, 08:39:51 AM »
Not the Assyrians?  THEY invented the War Chariots that conquered much of Egypt and they ruled for 300 years ..
It seems not:
Quote
The earliest fully developed spoke-wheeled horse chariots are from the chariot burials of the Andronovo (Timber-Grave) sites of the Sintashta-Petrovka Proto-Indo-Iranian culture in modern Russia and Kazakhstan from around 2000 BC.
Quote
The earliest depiction of vehicles in the context of warfare is on the Standard of Ur in southern Mesopotamia, c. 2500 BCE.

2 solid-wheel chariot at bottom right
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Offline SANDRO43

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #142 on: April 03, 2019, 09:06:14 PM »
IN WHAT YEAR WAS CHRIST BORN?

Matthew's Gospel says during the reign of King Herod the Great, who died in 4 BC according to Josephus's Antiquities of the Jews - thus the year should be around 6 BC.

At that time the Julian calendar was used which was ordinal in nature, years being reckoned as the "Nth year Ab urbe condita (since the city's foundation)" or more simply as the "Nth year in X's consulate". The Roman number system had no 0, which was only introduced in the Middle Ages due to the influence of Indian/Arabic arithmetic and mathematics.


If we were to plot those years on the time scale then in use, we would have:

(BC) etc. etc. - IInd before - Ist before --> Ist - IInd - IIIrd - IVth - Vth - etc. etc. (AD)

Therefore we would have to use an expression like VIth BC, a real contradiction :D.

BTW, the Gregorian calendar we now use has no year 0, either.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2019, 09:09:13 PM by SANDRO43 »
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Offline msmob

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #143 on: April 04, 2019, 01:05:51 AM »
So, what year IS it and am I much younger ? ;)
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Offline SANDRO43

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #144 on: April 04, 2019, 10:14:42 AM »
So, what year IS it
Xrist knows ::) ;).
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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #145 on: April 17, 2019, 07:44:38 PM »
NEW DISCOVERIES AT SAQQARA

Saqqara is an extensive necropolis some 30 km south of Memphis (modern-day Cairo), the capital of the Old Kingdom (3rd-6th dinasties, 2980-2475 BC), featuring the first but not very successful Egyptian attempts at building pyramids:


Djoser's step pyramid - Snefru's 1st pyramid - Snefru's 2nd, bent pyramid
(see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Egyptian_pyramids)

In addition to pharaohs' lofty pyramids, Saqqara also contains the tombs of royal princesses and important court dignitaries, usually in low mastabas with underground burial chambers:

Continuing excavations in the area where Pharaoh Djedkara Isesi's (2420-2380 BC?) pyramid once stood

Hor Djedkhau's site and its reconstruction

have brought to light the underground tomb of Khuy, with unusually well-preserved wall decorations and his burial chamber, with pieces of a white limestone sarcophagus still containing his remains:


« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 07:49:36 PM by SANDRO43 »
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Offline SANDRO43

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #146 on: May 04, 2019, 06:09:51 PM »
GAUGAMELA. WHERE?

Here on October 1, 331 BC Alexanderthe Great's army of the Hellenic League met and finally defeated the Persian army of Achaemenid King Darius III, with momentous consequences for the history of the Near East - and elsewhere.


Mosaic of the battle found in Pompeii - Alexander at left, Darius at right

Its location was estimated to be near Tel Gomel in Iraqi Kurdistan. A team of Italian archaeologists long excavating in the area may have discovered the actual site of the battle, thanks to originally Assyrian rock inscriptions overlaid by graffiti representing Hellenistic winged Victories (Někes) and Argead stars, celebrating the victory.

The Vergina Sun also known as the Star of Vergina, Vergina Star, Macedonian Star or Argead Star, the possible royal symbol of the Argead dynasty of Macedon

http://www.nationalgeographic.it/wallpaper/2019/04/15/foto/archeologia_nuove_scoperte_kurdistan_iracheno-4371232/1/ (includes video)
« Last Edit: May 04, 2019, 06:13:09 PM by SANDRO43 »
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Offline SANDRO43

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #147 on: May 06, 2019, 06:51:33 PM »
THANK AN ITALIAN CARDINAL FOR THE MAGNA CHARTA!

Delving into history one can find some surprising facts ;).

THE HISTORICAL SCENARIO
1215: John Lackland, Plantagenet King of England and Duke of Normandy, needed money and troops for his wars in France. English Barons violently opposed his edicts to raise them, and forced him to sign the 1st version of the document.

Briefly, into the dispute enters Pope Innocent III - at the time, Popes were an indisputable authority on matters both spiritual and political in a wholly Catholic Europe - who declares the document null and void, threatening excommunication for whoever should support it, but sending over to England Cardinal Giacomo Guala Bicchieri as his Legate with full authority to represent him and settle matters.


Pope Innocent III - Cardinal Guala Bicchieri

Ultimately in 1217 the 2nd and final version of the Charta is ready and signed by all concerned, including young Henry III who succeeded his father John as King.

As a reward for his services, King Henry III granted him the rectory of Chesterton - that is, the responsibility for the parish church but also the right to collect its tithes (a 10th of all produce) and ownership of considerable rectorial land. He used the funds to have the Abbey of St. Andrea built in his native Vercelli.


Abbey of St. Andrea - Copy of the 1217 document in the British Library

The basic tenets of the 1217 Charta - like habeas corpus, Parliamentary representation, etc. - have survived for 800+ years in the Constitutions of an untold number of free countries.

Therefore, thank a basically unknown Italian Cardinal from Vercelli for the freedoms you enjoy today :D.
 
« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 07:02:03 PM by SANDRO43 »
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Online jone

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Re: LEATHERNECK
« Reply #148 on: May 06, 2019, 07:56:26 PM »
LEATHERNECK

I had always assumed that the nickname applied to US Marines only. I just discovered that it originated earlier for Royal Marines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leatherneck), in consideration of the stiff leather neck "stock" they wore, more as a means to keep their posture erect than as a neck protection from enemy slashes.

I added it to my Nautical Glossary (http://www.floriani.it/Glossary/NauticalGlossary-eng.htm), now boasting 920 terms (804 illustrated) ;D.

Another moniker applied to the US Marines:   Jarheads.   I always thought it was a somewhat insulting term until I found out that it actually was affectionately given to the USMC in WWII.   Some of the helmets that were used as head gear/protectors by the Marines in the island hopping campaign were manufactured by the Mason Jar Company.
Kissing girls is a goodness.  It beats the hell out of card games.  - Robert Heinlein

Offline BdHvA

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Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #149 on: May 07, 2019, 08:05:59 PM »
Have not bothered to fact check this but it seems correct.

Experierence is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you. A. Huxley

 

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