It appears you have not registered with our community. To register please click here ...

!!

Welcome to Russian Women Discussion - the most informative site for all things related to serious long-term relationships and marriage to a partner from the Former Soviet Union countries!

Please register (it's free!) to gain full access to the many features and benefits of the site. Welcome!

+-

Author Topic: FOR HISTORY BUFFS  (Read 33808 times)

0 Members and 21 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline SANDRO43

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10622
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Sandro's Website
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #150 on: May 08, 2019, 08:14:41 AM »
Have not bothered to fact check this but it seems correct.
Yes, I remember reading about this. Ungrateful Colonial sods :( ;D.
Milan's "Duomo"

Online Gator

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14871
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Married 5-10 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: LEATHERNECK
« Reply #151 on: May 08, 2019, 08:34:29 AM »
Another moniker applied to the US Marines:   Jarheads.   I always thought it was a somewhat insulting term until I found out that it actually was affectionately given to the USMC in WWII.   Some of the helmets that were used as head gear/protectors by the Marines in the island hopping campaign were manufactured by the Mason Jar Company.

Other nicknames:  Gungy - play on the term "Gung Ho" for those with extreme Marine mentality

                            Gyrene - so old that my father (WWII vet) used it (yes, I  am a war baby).

                            Grunt - My favorite,  "a term of affection used to denote that filthy, sweaty, dirt-encrusted, footsore, camouflage-painted, tired, sleepy, beautiful little son of a bitch who has kept the wolf away from the door for over two hundred years."

The term "grunt" is used also  in Army for soldiers whose MOS is  infantry.  And it has led to the derogatory term POG (person other than grunt, not a "real" soldier)

Online jone

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6775
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Committed > 1 year
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #152 on: May 08, 2019, 09:19:02 AM »
I think the term Gyrene stems from G.I. Marine (or General Issue).   As I am from a family of marines (even though I went Army ROTC) they all conclude that such was its origin.  While such is folklore, the term stems back all the way (and possibly further) to 1894.
Kissing girls is a goodness.  It beats the hell out of card games.  - Robert Heinlein

Offline SANDRO43

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10622
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Sandro's Website
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: None (yet)
ERASMUS
« Reply #153 on: June 20, 2019, 04:58:43 PM »
SOFIA CORRADI,
THE MOTHER OF THE EUROPEAN ERASMUS PROJECT


1957
Sofia Corradi, born in 1934, was a 23 y.o. Law student at Rome's University La Sapienza when in 1957 she went to Columbia University on a Fulbright scholarship, obtaining a Master's degree in Comparative Univesity Legislation.   

You can imagine her disappointment when, back in Italy, she was told by her University staff (ironically, La Sapienza means Knowledge) that her foreign credits were valueless here, and she had to pass all her remainng exams locally anyway for her degree. She did with flying colours, receiving many offers of employment from private companies, but she chose to pursue a University career.

However, she started lobbying in Italy and Europe, promoting since 1969 the idea that a program of foreign student interchange among European faculties would benefit all involved.

1987
The European Region Action Scheme for the Mobility of University Students, abbreviated into ERASMUS, was finally approved by the UE Commission.

To date, 2,2+ million students have benefited from this very successful project in 4.000+ University institutions in 31 countries, thanks to the conviction and perseverance of this Italian lady :).
« Last Edit: June 20, 2019, 05:10:28 PM by SANDRO43 »
Milan's "Duomo"

Offline msmob

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7872
  • Country: ie
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #154 on: June 21, 2019, 01:23:26 AM »
"Mama Erasmus "   

http://www.sofiacorradi.eu/

Thank you, for the info on a lady I knew nothing about ...  I hope UK students will not lose the options this lady has opended up for them
No to Brexit, Yes to a People's Vote on Brexit, THEN a General Election

Offline SANDRO43

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10622
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Sandro's Website
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #155 on: July 24, 2019, 05:16:17 PM »
A STRONG COFFEE TO START THE DAY

A long-ingrained Italian habit. Why and when did it start? I was surprised to learn from a TV documentary that it precisely started in October, 1917 :o.

THE SCENARIO
Italy had a treaty of alliance with Germany and Austria contemplating military assistance in case of an attack on one of the allies, which was not what happened in 1914 and justified our remaining neutrals in the initial conflict.

Anyway, we joined WWI in May, 1915 beside France and Great Britain, our enemy being the neighbouring Austrians. The mountain war was somewhat static, and Marshal Luigi Cadorna, our Chief of Army Staff, concentrated on our frontier on the plains, ordering no less than 12 offensive attacks in 3 years on the front of the river Isonzo, all unsuccessful.



Luigi Cadorna - Grandfather Mario - Armando Diaz - 11th Battle of Isonzo (blue area at right)

My grandfather, a volunteer, was wounded by machine fire while a lieutenant leading the assault of his platoon of the 29th Infantry Division on Austrian trenches (September 14, 1916).

Cadorna's view of his repeated failures to advance was to lay the blame on soldiers' cowardice, and ordering decimazioni on the units he considered at fault. In October, 1917 the Austrians and Germans, freed by the Russian Revolution from the Eastern front, launched a powerful offensive that routed the Italian Army and caused it to retreat to the river Piave.

Fortunately Cadorna was then dismissed and replaced by a younger and more intelligent General Armando Diaz, who realised that morale was a major problem with our troops, and introduced measures to improve it, like unit leaves from the front line thitherto unheard of.

He also ordered that each soldier should receive a cup of warm coffee and sugar each morning, to make him fully awake and alert :D.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2019, 05:31:20 PM by SANDRO43 »
Milan's "Duomo"

Online Gator

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14871
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Married 5-10 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #156 on: July 24, 2019, 08:58:13 PM »
Sandro, this is the era of Ernest Hemingway's Farewell to Arms, a novel derived from his own experiences.   Hemingway served  as an ambulance driver in the Alpine Front.  He was seriously wounded, and he recovered in a hospital in Milan where he fell in love with his nurse. 

I just googled it, and discovered the hospital was located in your city,  Milan.  Also interesting. the novel could not be published in Italy until 1948 even though it was first published in 1929.   
« Last Edit: July 24, 2019, 09:00:18 PM by Gator »

Offline SANDRO43

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10622
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Sandro's Website
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #157 on: July 25, 2019, 03:38:32 PM »
this is the era of Ernest Hemingway's Farewell to Arms, a novel derived from his own experiences.  Hemingway served  as an ambulance driver in the Alpine Front.  He was seriously wounded, and he recovered in a hospital in Milan where he fell in love with his nurse.
I read the book - a long time ago - and also saw the film from it, the 1957 version with Rock Hudson and Jennifer Jones, not the 1932 version with Gary Cooper: 


Quote
I just googled it, and discovered the hospital was located in your city, Milan.
At that time the Ospedale Maggiore, Milan's largest hospital, was staffed by the Red Cross, as were other hospitals for the military like Rome's Celio - here my Pilot Sergeant father standing at attention before a visiting Princess Maria José, DIL to the King (May, 1943):


His trust in the Red Cross may be the reason why in 1948 I was taken to Milan's only remaining Red Cross Hospital Principessa Jolanda, next to Santa Maria delle Grazie and Leonardo's Last Supper fresco, for a tonsillectomy after I had foolishly gulped air several times during a long ride with him on the back seat of his Guzzino. 


The Moto Guzzi 65 Guzzino (1946 tol 1954)

Since I could not eat solid food for a few days, it was my introduction to raspberry ice cream and syrup, which I still love nowadays :D.

Quote
Also interesting. the novel could not be published in Italy until 1948 even though it was first published in 1929.
I assume because the Fascist regime did not like its depiction of the Italian Army débâcle at Caporetto ;).
« Last Edit: July 26, 2019, 08:00:29 AM by SANDRO43 »
Milan's "Duomo"

Online jone

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6775
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Committed > 1 year
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #158 on: July 25, 2019, 05:20:36 PM »
Classic bike, Sandro.

I'd love to restore one of those.
Kissing girls is a goodness.  It beats the hell out of card games.  - Robert Heinlein

Offline SANDRO43

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10622
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Sandro's Website
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #159 on: July 25, 2019, 07:04:52 PM »
Classic bike, Sandro. I'd love to restore one of those.
Here is a list, they sell from 2,000 to 4,000 Euros ;): http://www.subito.it/annunci-italia/vendita/usato/?q=guzzino+65
Milan's "Duomo"

Online Gator

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14871
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Married 5-10 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #160 on: July 25, 2019, 08:45:57 PM »

... here my Pilot Sergeant father standing at attention before a visiting Princess Maria José, DIL to the King


You are connecting the dots, finding photos of the named places, even including your family.   



Quote

I assume because the Fascist regime did not like its depiction of the Italian Army débâcle at Caporetto ;).


Plus the anti-militarism.  And perhaps the most important reason involved Benito.  From Wiki:

Quote
More than one biographer suggests that at the base of the censorship of the Fascist regime in the novel there had also been a personal antipathy between the writer and Benito Mussolini. Hemingway had interviewed him in 1923, shortly after he seized power, and in his article in the Toronto Star he poured scorn on Mussolini, calling him "the biggest bluff in Europe." But, apart from the official reactions, it is known that Mussolini did not like the article at all: Hemingway described Mussolini as trying to impress the media by pretending to be deeply absorbed in reading, while in reality holding a French-English dictionary–held upside down.[17] The Italian translation had in fact already been prepared illegally in 1943 by Fernanda Pivano, leading to her arrest in Turin.


Offline msmob

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7872
  • Country: ie
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #161 on: July 29, 2019, 03:17:15 AM »
A STRONG COFFEE TO START THE DAY


Anyway, we joined WWI in May, 1915 beside France and Great Britain, our enemy being the neighbouring Austrians.

Interesting to read from an Italian's perspective - having never been to Italy, but a frequent visitor to Austria and hearing all about he injustices of Südtirol from an Austrian  Tirolean ....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Tyrol

The EU means that such disputes are essentially  moribund - another reason I fear 'Brexit' and a 'hard border'on the Island of Ireland
No to Brexit, Yes to a People's Vote on Brexit, THEN a General Election

Offline SANDRO43

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10622
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Sandro's Website
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #162 on: July 29, 2019, 07:29:21 AM »
a frequent visitor to Austria and hearing all about he injustices of Südtirol from an Austrian  Tirolean .... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Tyrol
As the quoted reference says:
Quote
The province is granted a considerable level of self-government, consisting of a large range of exclusive legislative and executive powers and a fiscal regime that allows it to retain a 90% of revenue, while remaining a net contributor to the national budget. As of 2016, South Tyrol is the wealthiest province in Italy and among the wealthiest in the European Union.

I doubt Austria would be as generous, were it to rejoin its Vaterland ;).
Milan's "Duomo"

Offline msmob

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7872
  • Country: ie
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #163 on: July 29, 2019, 07:40:38 AM »
As the quoted reference says:
I doubt Austria would be as generous, were it to rejoin its Vaterland ;).

May be THAT's why the ( 'north') Tiroleans want it back ? ;)

No to Brexit, Yes to a People's Vote on Brexit, THEN a General Election

Offline SANDRO43

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10622
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Sandro's Website
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #164 on: July 29, 2019, 06:55:07 PM »
May be THAT's why the ( 'north') Tiroleans want it back ? ;)
I also doubt that the majority of German-speaking South Tyrolers would like to go back 100 years, they are having it too good now ;D.

The region was annexed to Italy in 1918, this being ratified by the 1923 Treaty of Lausanne which settled European frontiers after the end of WWI. Our main reason to want it was for border security, because it was a foreign wedge south of the Alps, our "natural" frontier. Nowadays that is no longer much important strategically ::).

We argued with the French who wanted to annex part of Valle d'Aosta at the end of WWII, and granted that region in the NW Alps a special statute similar to South Tyrol's.

Similar statutes were also granted to Friuli-Venezia Giulia, and to Sardinia and Sicily for their poor economy and geographic isolation, although in the latter case maybe it was not such a good idea considering the Mafia infiltrations into local politics 8).
« Last Edit: July 30, 2019, 07:23:30 AM by SANDRO43 »
Milan's "Duomo"

Offline SANDRO43

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10622
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Sandro's Website
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #165 on: July 31, 2019, 04:48:50 PM »
THE NAME "PIZZA" IS LONGOBARD?

I already mentioned the Longobards some time ago (http://www.russianwomendiscussion.com/index.php?topic=21781.msg489867#msg489867), a Germanic people who invaded Italy in the mid 500s and ruled most of it until 774, when defeated by the Franks of Charlemagne.

As in most other southern countries, a cheap and popular food was made by heating in a simple oven a dough of wheat/corn meal, maybe later sprinkled with some condiment to make it more appealing. Most peoples call/called it pita.


After settling down in Italy, the Longobards gradually abandoned their Germanic language for the Latin of common people, but had some difficulty in pronouncing some Italian consonants like T, replacing it with a Z. Another hypothesis points to their word bĭzzo-pĭzzo meaning 'hunk of bread'.

Thus pita became known as pizza here :D.

We had to wait until Cristoforo Colombo discovered the Americas, and tomatoes arrived in Europe, for a proper pizza/pita centuries later, though.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2019, 06:41:53 AM by SANDRO43 »
Milan's "Duomo"

Offline msmob

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7872
  • Country: ie
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #166 on: August 01, 2019, 06:45:15 AM »
Pita, is still simply bread in Farsi, no ?
No to Brexit, Yes to a People's Vote on Brexit, THEN a General Election

Offline SANDRO43

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10622
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Sandro's Website
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #167 on: August 01, 2019, 12:02:11 PM »
Pita, is still simply bread in Farsi, no ?
Don't know about Farsi, it is in Greek, Arabic, Hebrew, etc. ;). See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pita for additional names.
Milan's "Duomo"

Online Gator

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14871
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Married 5-10 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #168 on: August 01, 2019, 04:48:53 PM »
Don't know about Farsi, it is in Greek, Arabic, Hebrew, etc. ;). See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pita for additional names.

The Farsi word for bread is naan. 

Bread was a highlight of the Iranian diet with small baker shops and aromatic ovens dotting the cities. The bread was flat, produced in varying thicknesses.  My favorite was the thicker version, thicker than pizza crust, called barbary?

Offline Boethius

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2016
  • Country: 00
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: No Selection
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #169 on: August 01, 2019, 07:10:00 PM »
Barbari, I think.  They used to sell it, and another bread called lavash, in Kyiv's  then central bread store, on Khreshchatyk.  These breads were known in Ukraine via Armenia, and were considered "Armenian" breads, but they're known in Iran as well, I believe.

The only things I miss from Ukraine (other than relatives) are outstanding rye bread and light butter.

This post was composed without the aid of google.
To love someone means to see him as God intended him. - Fyodor Dostoevksy

Offline msmob

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7872
  • Country: ie
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #170 on: August 01, 2019, 11:21:55 PM »
The Farsi word for bread is naan. 

Close.. it's Non .. but your were certainly right - it's not Pita and I do not claim to be right - every time.. :)


No to Brexit, Yes to a People's Vote on Brexit, THEN a General Election

Offline SANDRO43

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10622
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Sandro's Website
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #171 on: August 02, 2019, 07:37:55 AM »
Quote
Etymology
The earliest appearance of "naan" in English is from 1803 in a travelogue of William Tooke. The Persian word nān 'bread' is attested in Middle Persian as n'n 'bread, food', which is of Iranian origin, and is a cognate with Parthian ngn, Kurdish nan, Balochi nagan, Sogdian nγn-, and Pashto nəγan 'bread'.[6]

The form naan has a widespread distribution, having been borrowed in a range of languages spoken in Central Asia and the Indian subcontinent, where it usually refers to a kind of flatbread (tandyr nan). The spelling naan is first attested in 1979, and has since become the normal English spelling.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naan

Quote
Close.. it's Non ..
Non(e) in the above examples ;D.
Milan's "Duomo"

Online Gator

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14871
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Married 5-10 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #172 on: August 02, 2019, 08:26:21 AM »
Close.. it's Non .. but your were certainly right - it's not Pita and I do not claim to be right - every time.. :)


Maybe "non" if spoken by an Oxford graduate, but "naan" if transcripted precisely. 

Hit the audio play link at the very top of this list of foods: 

http://app2brain.com/learn-languages/persian/food-drinks/#basic-food-spices

I did not retain many Farsi words from 40+ years ago, yet this is one.  Food, numbers and words I could tell a taxi driver where I was going (who pulled over for me but laughing their ass off about my pronunciation). 

Offline SANDRO43

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10622
  • Country: it
  • Gender: Male
    • Sandro's Website
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #173 on: August 14, 2019, 04:35:38 PM »
OXFORD UNVERSITY'S OLD BOOK PROJECT

Apropos of "Lord is My Light" Uni...


Their announcement: The 15cBOOKTRADE Project (ERC 2014-2019) is now completed, but research continues.
Quote
Books printed between 1450 (the year of Gutenberg’s invention of modern printing) and 1500 (conventional cut-off date in scholarship) are known as incunabula. Some 30,000 editions are known today, in some 450,000 surviving copies, located in about 4,000 different public libraries, mostly in Europe and North America.

Each surviving copy has a different history, which can be reconstructed with the help of physical evidence (ownership inscriptions, decoration, binding, coats of arms, manuscript annotations, stamps, prices, etc.) and bibliographical evidence (historic library catalogues, bookseller and auction catalogues, acquisition registers, etc.): all this is known as copy-specific information, or provenance, or material evidence, or post-production evidence.

The idea that underpins the 15cBOOKTRADE Project is to use the material evidence from these thousands of surviving books, as well as unique documentary evidence — the unpublished ledger of a Venetian bookseller in the 1480s which records the sale of 25,000 printed books with their prices — to address five fundamental questions relating to the introduction of printing in the West which have so far eluded scholarship, partly because of lack of evidence, partly because of the lack of effective tools to deal with existing evidence.

These five questions are:

1. Distribution, Use, and Reading Practices
2. The books’ contemporary market value
3. The transmission and dissemination of the texts incunabula contain
4. The circulation and re-use of the illustrations
5. Visualization


This project is uncovering many interesting facets of the world of old books, such as that the Bible was NOT the first book in print, that Venice appears to be their major producer (do the names of Aldus Manutius and Bodoni strike any bells? :D), and that grammars were the best sellers of the time.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2019, 04:41:21 PM by SANDRO43 »
Milan's "Duomo"

Offline msmob

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7872
  • Country: ie
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: > 10
Re: FOR HISTORY BUFFS
« Reply #174 on: August 14, 2019, 11:38:51 PM »
Thank you, Sandro.. Never jknew of this project  - interesting first fndings ..esp that the Bible wasn't the first book in print

Look forward to seeing the Venice book shop's top 10 sellers..May be how to find a Russian woman ? ;)

No to Brexit, Yes to a People's Vote on Brexit, THEN a General Election

 

+-RWD Stats

Members
Total Members: 9990
Latest: MatroskinFM
New This Month: 4
New This Week: 0
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 496630
Total Topics: 19518
Most Online Today: 4873
Most Online Ever: 12701
(January 14, 2020, 07:04:55 AM)
Users Online
Members: 24
Guests: 4849
Total: 4873

+-Recent Posts

Re: Light at the end of the tunnel for saving Western Society by Boethius
Today at 01:24:50 AM

Re: Light at the end of the tunnel for saving Western Society by Boethius
Today at 01:21:29 AM

Re: Light at the end of the tunnel for saving Western Society by Trenchcoat
Today at 12:19:16 AM

Re: Starting and Running a Business in the Republic of Georgia, Batumi by Maxx2
Today at 12:08:04 AM

Re: Newly Joining the Married Club: Steve and T by SteveInBoston
Yesterday at 07:43:36 PM

Re: Visas for Children Over 21 Years of Age by BillyB
Yesterday at 07:34:57 PM

Re: Visas for Children Over 21 Years of Age by whynotme
Yesterday at 06:42:47 PM

Re: Visas for Children Over 21 Years of Age by whynotme
Yesterday at 06:36:49 PM

Re: Visas for Children Over 21 Years of Age by BillyB
Yesterday at 06:13:22 PM

Re: Visas for Children Over 21 Years of Age by GQBlues
Yesterday at 05:36:00 PM

Powered by EzPortal