It appears you have not registered with our community. To register please click here ...

!!

Welcome to Russian Women Discussion - the most informative site for all things related to serious long-term relationships and marriage to a partner from the Former Soviet Union countries!

Please register (it's free!) to gain full access to the many features and benefits of the site. Welcome!

+-

Author Topic: The Struggle For Ukraine  (Read 2138 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline JayH

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5210
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Looking > 5 years
  • Trips: > 10
The Struggle For Ukraine
« on: October 19, 2017, 06:25:48 PM »
  The battle for Ukraine to extract itself out of the Soviet Union has continued long after the disintegration of the FSU  as Soviet Russia and Putin's kleptocracy has fought to maintain control and influence over Ukraine.Ukrainians fought a bloody battle on the streets of Kyiv and now in  an ongoing war in eastern Ukraine in the desire for freedom and a democracy.

  My fundamental observation is contained in this sentence  quote "Ukrainian civil society has reason to be proud of what it has accomplished to date."end quote .The question some still ask is "what has changed"? Well-- a lot has changed- but progress is still too slow -- a point most agree on.

  Progress in Ukraine is clearly discernible on many fronts, but it is in danger. Incomplete reforms threaten to undermine the credibility of new forces and lead to the disillusionment of millions of Ukrainians. This would open the way for revanchist and populist forces to hijack Ukraines transformation agenda.


  Nearly four years on from its Euromaidan revolution, Ukraine is fighting for survival as an independent and viable state.

   This report makes the case for increased Western support, and argues the EU has been too timid in applying its unprecedented political mandate to drive forward post-2014 reforms in the country.                   

  The report, which includes policy recommendations, assesses Ukraines position and prospects, and examines its double existential threat: resisting Russian interference, and the fierce internal contest to determine its own political, institutional and civic future.     

  The report covers six critical areas: geopolitics and security in the context of the conflict with Russia; European integration and the demands of the Association Agreement; economic reform; governance, democratization and the media; the role of civil society in reforms; and efforts to combat corruption.   

The Struggle for Ukraine

http://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/publications/research/2017-10-18-struggle-for-ukraine-ash-gunn-lough-lutsevych-nixey-sherr-wolczuk.pdf

http://www.chathamhouse.org/publication/struggle-for-ukraine

http://f1.media.brightcove.com/7/2848955551001/2848955551001_5600139110001_5600112311001.mp4?pubId=2848955551001&videoId=5600112311001

A quick read summary of issues is here--


Five Things to Know about the Problems Facing Ukraine


(1) Ukraine is currently fighting two separate battles.

(2) Seven per cent of Ukraines internationally recognized territory has either been annexed by Russia or is controlled by pro-Russian separatists.

(3) Ukraine has struggled to weaken the grip of vested interests and establish a rules-based market economy domestically.

(4) The outcome of Ukraines protracted domestic battle with corruption will ultimately define its future.

(5) The Euromaidan protest in late 2013 was triggered by the Ukrainian governments suspension of plans for closer integration with the EU.




http://medium.com/chatham-house/five-things-to-know-about-the-problems-facing-ukraine-27c2b22f5074


The struggle for Ukraine: a detailed analysis of reform and failure after Euromaidan


Ukraines principal challenges
1. Security and defense

2. Reforms. Eurointegration

3 Economic reforms

4 Democratization and governance

5 Human capital and civil society

6 Anti-corruption reforms

Recommendations

To strengthen security,To advance EU integration,To boost economic and political reform,



http://euromaidanpress.com/2017/10/20/the-struggle-for-ukraine-a-detailed-analysis-of-reform-and-failure-after-1991/
« Last Edit: October 19, 2017, 07:21:44 PM by JayH »
SLAVA UKRAYINI  ! HEROYAM SLAVA!!!!
Слава Украине! Слава героям слава!Слава Україні! Слава героям!
 translated as: Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!!!  is a Ukrainian greeting slogan being used now all over Ukraine to signify support for a free independent Ukraine

Offline JayH

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5210
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Looking > 5 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2017, 07:42:36 PM »
I have linked this article here because it is a summary of some history that led to much of the content of the above articles.
This is quite a good summary in such a short space.
Russias attitude has roots in the revolution and in the famine that killed 13 percent of Ukrainians.


Why does Putin want to control Ukraine? Ask Stalin.



In 2014, Russian officials looked with horror at the young people waving European flags and calling for democracy in Kievs Maidan Square and were determined to make sure such a movement would never spread to Russia itself: A mass anti-corruption protest particularly one that ends with occupation of the dictators palace is what Russias corrupt oligarchs fear most. Putin witnessed exactly that kind of chaos as a young KGB officer in Dresden in 1989, when the fall of the Berlin Wall struck him as catastrophic. He now blames protests against him on foreign agents and Hillary Clinton.

But the need to control Ukraine also has important roots in Russias historical memory, and the KGBs. Turbulence in Ukraine hits panic buttons, because anarchy in the Soviet Unions agricultural heartland has nearly destabilized Moscow more than once. Perhaps the best way to explain Putins paranoia and covetousness toward Kiev is this: Russia remembers those moments well.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/why-does-putin-want-control-ukraine-ask-stalin/2017/10/20/800a7afe-b427-11e7-a908-a3470754bbb9_story.html?hpid=hp_no-name_opinion-card-f%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.85cc61a6d83d

http://www.kyivpost.com/article/opinion/op-ed/anne-applebaum-putin-want-control-ukraine-ask-stalin.html

If you have a problem reading the previous links-- it should be possible to read in full here ---

http://www.cetusnews.com/news/Perspective-%7C-Why-does-Putin-want-control-Ukraine--Ask-Stalin-.SkgypvuBFw6Z.html

« Last Edit: October 20, 2017, 07:50:56 PM by JayH »
SLAVA UKRAYINI  ! HEROYAM SLAVA!!!!
Слава Украине! Слава героям слава!Слава Україні! Слава героям!
 translated as: Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!!!  is a Ukrainian greeting slogan being used now all over Ukraine to signify support for a free independent Ukraine

Online jone

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5771
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Committed > 1 year
  • Trips: > 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2017, 08:04:06 PM »
I have linked this article here because it is a summary of some history that led to much of the content of the above articles.
This is quite a good summary in such a short space.
Russias attitude has roots in the revolution and in the famine that killed 13 percent of Ukrainians.


Why does Putin want to control Ukraine? Ask Stalin.



In 2014, Russian officials looked with horror at the young people waving European flags and calling for democracy in Kievs Maidan Square and were determined to make sure such a movement would never spread to Russia itself: A mass anti-corruption protest particularly one that ends with occupation of the dictators palace is what Russias corrupt oligarchs fear most. Putin witnessed exactly that kind of chaos as a young KGB officer in Dresden in 1989, when the fall of the Berlin Wall struck him as catastrophic. He now blames protests against him on foreign agents and Hillary Clinton.

But the need to control Ukraine also has important roots in Russias historical memory, and the KGBs. Turbulence in Ukraine hits panic buttons, because anarchy in the Soviet Unions agricultural heartland has nearly destabilized Moscow more than once. Perhaps the best way to explain Putins paranoia and covetousness toward Kiev is this: Russia remembers those moments well.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/why-does-putin-want-control-ukraine-ask-stalin/2017/10/20/800a7afe-b427-11e7-a908-a3470754bbb9_story.html?hpid=hp_no-name_opinion-card-f%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.85cc61a6d83d

http://www.kyivpost.com/article/opinion/op-ed/anne-applebaum-putin-want-control-ukraine-ask-stalin.html

If you have a problem reading the previous links-- it should be possible to read in full here ---

http://www.cetusnews.com/news/Perspective-%7C-Why-does-Putin-want-control-Ukraine--Ask-Stalin-.SkgypvuBFw6Z.html

Putin controls 'part' of Ukraine.  At a tremendous cost.  But he has permanently driven a wedge between the Ukrainian and the Russian peoples.  The only way Ukraine would ever ally with Russia is if the country was forced to through subjugation.

I would be interested in knowing, if anyone could provide the numbers - the economic output of the Donbas before the war and presently.   And, the cost (or drain) on the Russian economy by Krim.  Brent Crude is now at $57 a barrel.  But the major oil producers are predicting 2018 as having a significant drop in prices again, with Brent Crude hovering around $45. 

Russia mortgaged its economy in the oil sale to China.  It continues on, with infrastructure and economic development suffering.  At the same time, Putin continues to invest heavily in military spending, last week proclaiming that he had the best weapons in the world.  Of course, one of the only true items of export, aside from Russian oil is Russian weapons.  Quite honestly, my take is that the Israelis have the best military technology in the world, presently.  Economic and efficient.
Experience keeps a dear school but fools will learn at no other - Benjamin Franklin

Offline JayH

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5210
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Looking > 5 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2017, 04:39:28 PM »

The elephant in the room for all issues in Ukraine is Russia. The battle to get Russia out of Ukraine is ongoing -- and not just the battle for physical territory in eastern Ukraine and the Crimea.
Russia is intent on preventing Ukraine succeeding as a democracy .

Why Ukraines Next Revolution Wont Be on the Streets

But the run-up to the 2019 elections will be troublesome. Russian meddling in Ukraines political system is growing. I see a heightened crisis in Ukraine because [Poroshenko] has decided to take on [Dmytro] Firtash, he said. Firtash has worked closely with the Kremlin. There is a serious criminal investigation [into Firtash] by the general prosecutor. And [Firtash] is funneling serious money to political rivals to undermine Poroshenko.


This is an extension of the Kremlins 2014 strategy designed to reverse the Revolution of Dignity and prevent it from spreading. Moscow wants to create a neo-Russian republic in eastern and southern Ukraine as a '[blockage] to the Maidan, he said.

http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/blogs/ukrainealert/why-ukraine-s-next-revolution-won-t-be-on-the-streets
SLAVA UKRAYINI  ! HEROYAM SLAVA!!!!
Слава Украине! Слава героям слава!Слава Україні! Слава героям!
 translated as: Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!!!  is a Ukrainian greeting slogan being used now all over Ukraine to signify support for a free independent Ukraine

Offline Brasscasing

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2087
  • Country: ca
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: No Selection
  • Trips: No Selection
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2017, 06:24:07 PM »
There ya go, Jay...

Canadian arms makers get OK to sell to Ukraine

..."The Liberal cabinet has given the green light for Canadian defence contractors to sell weapons to Ukraine in a watershed decision which a senior official of that country hopes will influence the Trump administration to follow suit.

The embattled eastern European country has been added to Canada's automatic firearms country control list."...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-ukraine-weapons-1.4446891

Better late than never, I guess.

Whether it actually happens or not is a different story. The current federal government is notorious for saying one thing and doing another, but we'll see.

Brass
...Build the wall. Even Heaven has a gate...

"Because without America there is no free world" ~ Canada Free Press

Offline JayH

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5210
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Looking > 5 years
  • Trips: > 10
Little Hope for Little Russia
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2018, 05:38:26 PM »

This is quite an interesting read. It touches the various issues and is quite a good summary.

The alienation of Ukrainians and the bleak prospects for rebranding them as Little Russians belie the notion of Russian success in Ukraine.

Little Hope for Little Russia

Current analysis of Russian foreign policy largely depictswhether with approbation or anxietya Kremlin going from strength to strength. With a grab-bag of low-cost, low-risk measures, Russia has reputedly confounded the West, exacerbating our internal divisions, interfering in our elections, and in some cases perhaps even affecting the outcome. Moscow has supposedly snatched Georgia and Ukraine from the clutches of NATO, seized the initiative throughout the Middle East, and enhanced Russian positions in virtually every corner of the globe. Ah, how quaint now sound the recent dismissals of Russia as just a regional power, or a gas station masquerading as a country! The Russians have risen from their knees, and we suddenly perceive with alarm that they are ten feet tall.

However, this vision of a risingor rampagingRussia needs a serious rethinking at least as far as Moscows goals in Ukraine are concerned. The assessment of Russian success in Ukraine is largely rooted in two suppositions: a) that Russian military interventions in Ukraine (as well as in Georgia in 2008) are long-overdue comeuppance for past NATO enlargement and just punishment for Western perfidy; and b) that Russian military action was required to thwart a Western plot to pull Ukraine into NATO in 2014, and prevented the emergence of a serious long-term threat to Russian security.

Neither of these suppositions makes any sense.


http://www.the-american-interest.com/2018/01/17/little-hope-little-russia/
SLAVA UKRAYINI  ! HEROYAM SLAVA!!!!
Слава Украине! Слава героям слава!Слава Україні! Слава героям!
 translated as: Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!!!  is a Ukrainian greeting slogan being used now all over Ukraine to signify support for a free independent Ukraine

Online BillyB

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11474
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
    • Good Story
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Married 5-10 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2018, 05:47:26 PM »



That's the big headline for today Jay? You're slipping. Ukraine just passed a bill to get the occupied regions back. Russia says it's a violation of the Minsk peace accords. Back to war?




http://www.yahoo.com/news/ukrainian-parliament-passes-bill-occupied-territories-121358340.html
Give a man a fire and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

Offline msmob

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3483
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Married 5-10 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2018, 03:18:27 AM »


That's the big headline for today Jay? You're slipping. Ukraine just passed a bill to get the occupied regions back.

NO, they haven't .. the Headline is misleading

1/ It re-iterates that the regions under 'rebel control' are 'occupied'

2/ It does not rule out the use of military force

Funnily enough Russia thinks as you do ;)

http://www.rt.com/politics/416319-ukraine-minsk-deal-donbas-russia/

"New Kiev  law marks shift from sabotage to burial on Minsk deal Russian senator"
Sod off Photobucket - this punter moved to flickr - rather than being blackmailed

Offline JayH

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5210
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Looking > 5 years
  • Trips: > 10
Ukraine can build an army to beat Putin
« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2018, 04:41:05 PM »
This is an assessment that I mostly agree with --please read the whole article  and not just the sample included.
I accept that many Americans here do not like Trump being criticised -- but what is going on in America right now ( & for the last 18 months)  is playing right into Putin's hands. The Russian international strategies have and are working way beyond any expectation.
  Obama sat on his hands over his last 4 years and never recognised the immense threat of Russia -- certainly Obama fiddled at the edges --the mistake was he totally underestimated Russia and it's intent.
  Now --Trump does nothing about Russia ( certainly nothing of any real consequence) -- it is a HUGE mistake.
The clock is ticking.


How Ukraine can build an army to beat Putin

Putin must destroy Ukraine as it exists now. To leave it intact is to destroy himself and his ambitions. He must win because of his war crimes: the mass graves, the torture in Donbas and Crimea, and the MH17 shootdown. All will put him firmly into The Hague as a war criminal. He must win because Ukraine is flourishing as a nation and it shows him as a failure. He must win because the truth will destroy him and Russia.

Putin must invade or subdue Ukraine. He is not yet ready, but the evidence of his preparation is stark. He continues to reinforce, fight and kill in the Donbas. He continues to test new equipment, people and methods in Syria. He reinforces Crimea. He reinforces Kaliningrad to block Western reinforcement. He stockpiles equipment in Belarus. He continues to reequip the army, especially with tanks and modern technological systems. All this is far beyond any peacetime needs. He spends precious national money on the military he needs elsewhere. He continues to train for a strategic war in the west which means Ukraine cannot escape this and will be a prime target. The Russian MOD says openly in the media that they need three more years to reequip the army in western Russia with tanks and to train troops. This time must not be wasted by Ukraine.


http://www.kyivpost.com/article/opinion/op-ed/glen-grant-ukraine-can-build-army-beat-putin.html
SLAVA UKRAYINI  ! HEROYAM SLAVA!!!!
Слава Украине! Слава героям слава!Слава Україні! Слава героям!
 translated as: Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!!!  is a Ukrainian greeting slogan being used now all over Ukraine to signify support for a free independent Ukraine

Offline Anotherkiwi

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4514
  • Country: nz
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Looking 1-2 years
  • Trips: 1 - 3
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2018, 05:03:55 PM »
That's a terrific article by someone who really knows what he's talking about - it's well worth the time taken to read it.  Also, there are a couple of extremely well-written comments from people who obviously have military experience.

Thanks, Jay!  :thumbsup:

Offline JayH

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5210
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Looking > 5 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2018, 05:25:02 PM »
That's a terrific article by someone who really knows what he's talking about - it's well worth the time taken to read it.  Also, there are a couple of extremely well-written comments from people who obviously have military experience.

Thanks, Jay!  :thumbsup:

Agree --there is a lot in it.
Generally speaking -I like to see the "big picture" fix in anything I do -- and not waste too much time on putting a finger in   the dyke! Ukraine was left no choice but to deal with immediate "small picture" issues first.The time comes to change gear -- and that is now.

One of the many plus points made in article is about younger battle experienced officers be put in command of fighting troops.That is in contrast with how it was back in early 2014 when seniority and rank was THE only factor.  I have seen first hand  how good and respected the younger new generation of leadership is received  -- both my the men they command -- and  as the reports filter back to their home towns( or based city/towns) the reception given on return from the east tells the story.

The morale of Ukrainian troops is now high -- and that must be used to advantage.
SLAVA UKRAYINI  ! HEROYAM SLAVA!!!!
Слава Украине! Слава героям слава!Слава Україні! Слава героям!
 translated as: Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!!!  is a Ukrainian greeting slogan being used now all over Ukraine to signify support for a free independent Ukraine

Offline kynrazor

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 186
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Always optimistic :)
  • Spouse's Country: No Selection
  • Status: Committed 0-1 year
  • Trips: 1 - 3
Re: Ukraine can build an army to beat Putin
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2018, 06:52:27 PM »
Putin must destroy Ukraine as it exists now. To leave it intact is to destroy himself and his ambitions. He must win because of his war crimes: the mass graves, the torture in Donbas and Crimea, and the MH17 shootdown. All will put him firmly into The Hague as a war criminal. He must win because Ukraine is flourishing as a nation and it shows him as a failure. He must win because the truth will destroy him and Russia.

I thought Putin's intention was to prevent Ukraine's accession to the EU? In that case he's already largely succeeded.

If his intention was to declare war on Ukraine, that would be wasting Russia's already strained economic resources and I do not see how it's possible to win such a conventional war anyway. At best it will be a war of attrition for Russia. Double stupid.

Putin must invade or subdue Ukraine. He is not yet ready, but the evidence of his preparation is stark. He continues to reinforce, fight and kill in the Donbas. He continues to test new equipment, people and methods in Syria. He reinforces Crimea. He reinforces Kaliningrad to block Western reinforcement. He stockpiles equipment in Belarus. He continues to reequip the army, especially with tanks and modern technological systems. All this is far beyond any peacetime needs. He spends precious national money on the military he needs elsewhere. He continues to train for a strategic war in the west which means Ukraine cannot escape this and will be a prime target. The Russian MOD says openly in the media that they need three more years to reequip the army in western Russia with tanks and to train troops. This time must not be wasted by Ukraine.

More like he's modernising the Russian military as he rightly should. Defending Russia and neutralising insurrections has always been very expensive as they have had too vast amounts of land and not enough mobile troops to properly cover it.

And on top of this, they've been distracted by the Syrian adventure, are still retro-modernising their aging military assets, still has yet to successfully establish their own silicon valley, with majority of their universities having inadequate funding and producing mostly sub-par scientific research (vital for military industrial powerhouse), etc etc.

Despite all this, you still think Russia has the appetite to conquer Ukraine? Seriously?

Unless the Russian Government has lost all sense of rationality, this is probably not going to happen.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2018, 06:56:19 PM by kynrazor »
Sincerely,
Kyn

Online BillyB

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11474
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
    • Good Story
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Married 5-10 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: Ukraine can build an army to beat Putin
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2018, 07:37:11 PM »
I thought Putin's intention was to prevent Ukraine's accession to the EU? In that case he's already largely succeeded.



Putin decided to play a long game. He's being patient. He'll continue to destabilize Ukraine hurting it's economy. People will be disillusioned that a Pro Western Ukrainian president can get the job done. Russian propaganda will have some effect. In time, the Ukrainian people will eventually vote in another guy Putin can buy.
Give a man a fire and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

Online jone

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5771
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Committed > 1 year
  • Trips: > 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2018, 07:55:37 PM »
I would not be surprised to see a substantial investment by Western powers into Ukrainian infrastructure.  While it is a risk, it is one that would thwart Putin.
Experience keeps a dear school but fools will learn at no other - Benjamin Franklin

Offline JayH

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5210
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Looking > 5 years
  • Trips: > 10
Enable Ukraine not only to defend itself, but also to rescue Europe
« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2018, 09:58:38 PM »
A summary point I have been making --enable Ukraine not only to defend itself, but also to rescue Europe


How the US Can Shore Up Ukraines Vulnerabilities in the Black Sea

Given Putins widening of the war against the West, it should be clear that multi-dimensional resistance to his efforts must be increased lest he continue to believe that he need merely push against the West to expose its weakness and ensure a Russian victory. The ideas advanced here should become part of a new program to enable Ukraine not only to defend itself, but also to rescue Europe by its example.

http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/blogs/ukrainealert/how-the-us-can-shore-up-ukraine-s-vulnerabilities-in-the-black-sea
SLAVA UKRAYINI  ! HEROYAM SLAVA!!!!
Слава Украине! Слава героям слава!Слава Україні! Слава героям!
 translated as: Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!!!  is a Ukrainian greeting slogan being used now all over Ukraine to signify support for a free independent Ukraine

Offline JayH

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5210
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Looking > 5 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2018, 10:14:53 PM »
I would not be surprised to see a substantial investment by Western powers into Ukrainian infrastructure.  While it is a risk, it is one that would thwart Putin.

There has been via the IMF   and  increased and increasing private investment over this last 4 years . I wrote 4 years ago how much was changing post Maidan -- and the rate of change is accelerating. There are so many positive indicators now --it is almost exciting.

That said ,it is been a hell of a time for everyday Ukrainians with huge leaps in costs of utilities ( at the behest of the IMF) - but--  considerable ground work has been happening that will be a foundation for future growth.
The biggest problem and hurdle that MUST be addressed  --is the ongoing corruption at the highest levels. Somehow --Ukraine needs to put the structure in place for a zero tolerance  approach to ending corruption.

Unfortunately -- with American leadership mute & hamstrung ( see-I said something nice about Trump!) over dealing with Russia -- there is an opportunity going begging. I would tie military and political aid & support from the US ( & EU) to internal reforms on corruption   ie guarantee Ukrainian independence if Ukraine can join western standards  of management of the country.

By far the easiest way to deal with Russia for the west--is to ensure a free & democratic Ukraine  succeeds as a democracy. The pressure that will apply to Putin's Russian kleptocracy would be immense from within Russia --once Russians see what is possible.
SLAVA UKRAYINI  ! HEROYAM SLAVA!!!!
Слава Украине! Слава героям слава!Слава Україні! Слава героям!
 translated as: Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!!!  is a Ukrainian greeting slogan being used now all over Ukraine to signify support for a free independent Ukraine

Offline tfcrew

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4210
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • North Texas
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Married > 10 years
  • Trips: 4 - 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #16 on: April 09, 2018, 07:53:11 PM »
Quote
The war in Ukraine is more devastating than you know
 by Cynthia Buckley, Ralph Clem, Jarod Fox and Erik Herron  April 9 at 7:00 AM
The fighting in eastern Ukraines Donbas region is entering its fifth year. More than 10,000 people have been killed in this persistent conflict; 2,800 were civilians. Nearly two million people have been internally displaced or put at risk if they remain in their homes.Today, the Donbas war is among the worst humanitarian crises in the world, with frequent attacks occurring from both sides across the oblasts (provinces) of Donetsk and Luhansk. Before the war, this compact, heavily urbanized and industrialized region held nearly 15 percent of Ukraines population (6.6 million) and generated 16 percent of its gross domestic product. Now its a war zone. And our research has documented that, as its hospitals and medical facilities are destroyed perhaps even targeted its citizens are being deprived of basic health-care services, echoing Syrias .....
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2018/04/09/the-war-in-ukraine-is-more-devastating-than-you-know/


 
The future is certain...it's the past that's unpredictable.

Offline krimster2

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1626
  • Country: us
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Looking 1-2 years
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #17 on: April 09, 2018, 08:30:12 PM »
live map here

http://ukrstream.tv/en/liveuamap

lot of activity around Mariupol today, yesterday 2 Russian armored brigades entered southern Ukraine from the east so the pretense of the Russian army not officially being there is no longer being "played" 

my nephew's iphone still has him stationed in Rostov so his brigade is not on the move yet

which card will Putin play first, Syria or Ukraine, I'm predicting that one will be a distraction for the other...

Offline krimster2

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1626
  • Country: us
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Looking 1-2 years
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #18 on: April 09, 2018, 10:59:58 PM »
when Putin makes his move on Ukraine he will also take the remainder of Republic of Georgia and Atlantic Richfield's Pipe-line
simultaneous attack north from Krim, west from Donbas, East from Transnistria to Odessa South towards Kiev
at least one will be a diversion
I think everything east of the dnipro will be seized along with southern Ukraine
the war will last less than 2 weeks and involve the entire Russian military
there will be a "major event" that triggers the invasion...

afterwards a new potsdam to divvy up Ukraine
should Western Ukraine continue as an independent nation or be absorbed by its neighbors

Offline msmob

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3483
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Married 5-10 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #19 on: April 09, 2018, 11:47:23 PM »
live map here

http://ukrstream.tv/en/liveuamap

lot of activity around Mariupol today, yesterday 2 Russian armored brigades entered southern Ukraine from the east so the pretense of the Russian army not officially being there is no longer being "played" 

my nephew's iphone still has him stationed in Rostov so his brigade is not on the move yet

which card will Putin play first, Syria or Ukraine, I'm predicting that one will be a distraction for the other...

The OSCE monitoring mission is strangely silent on this.
Sod off Photobucket - this punter moved to flickr - rather than being blackmailed

Offline krimster2

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1626
  • Country: us
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Looking 1-2 years
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #20 on: April 10, 2018, 01:03:53 AM »
their positions are too far away for them to directly observe the U/R border where they cross
haven't seen their press reports regarding secondary sources of info...

my sources from within the Russian military tell me Russia has been gearing up for a "blizkrieg" on Ukraine for quite some time
Putin's window of opportunity is exactly the length of time that Trump is in office...


Offline JayH

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5210
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Looking > 5 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #21 on: April 10, 2018, 02:16:24 AM »
live map here

http://ukrstream.tv/en/liveuamap

lot of activity around Mariupol today, yesterday 2 Russian armored brigades entered southern Ukraine from the east so the pretense of the Russian army not officially being there is no longer being "played" 



They did not actually enter Ukraine.
SLAVA UKRAYINI  ! HEROYAM SLAVA!!!!
Слава Украине! Слава героям слава!Слава Україні! Слава героям!
 translated as: Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!!!  is a Ukrainian greeting slogan being used now all over Ukraine to signify support for a free independent Ukraine

Offline JayH

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5210
  • Country: au
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Looking > 5 years
  • Trips: > 10
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2018, 12:38:05 PM »
Russia's imperialistic attitude towards independent Ukraine has turned an instinctive ally into an aggrieved adversary - and Vladimir Putin must personally accept much of the responsibility for the collapse of Kremlin influence in Moscow's traditional geopolitical heartlands


Russian retreat from Ukraine is a tale of unforced Kremlin errors and self-defeating imperial hubris

The ultimate example of Russias tone-deaf approach to Ukraine came in spring 2014, when Kremlin efforts to partition the country via hybrid military intervention left Moscows influence on Ukrainian affairs at historic lows and Putin's dreams of a new Eurasian empire in tatters. This blunder was to prove the final nail in the coffin of Russias Ukraine policy, but it was very much in line with all that had gone before. The decision to engineer pro-Russian uprisings inside Ukraine in early 2014 reflected Moscow's long-held but deluded belief that Russian-speaking Ukrainians would flock to the Kremlin banner when the time was right. It was the culmination of Russia's refusal since 1991 to recognize the nation-building dynamics at work in independent Ukraine.

Remarkably, Russia remains apparently incapable of learning from these failures. In early March 2018, the Kremlin once more succeeded in briefly uniting Ukrainian society against it. On this latest occasion, Moscow abruptly cut gas supplies to the country at a time when temperatures were averaging minus fifteen degrees. Ordinary Ukrainians responded to the emergency by rallying round and dramatically reducing their energy consumption. This allowed the population to survive unscathed, but many will remember how close Russias actions brought them to potential humanitarian catastrophe. Yet again, Moscow demonstrated its unrivaled ability to mobilize the Ukrainian population while simultaneously shooting itself in the foot.

It is hard to avoid the conclusion that for reasons rooted in its own sense of national identity, modern Russia simply cannot accept the idea of an independent Ukraine. This would go some way towards explaining Moscows otherwise irrational refusal to treat Ukraine as a fully sovereign nation, despite the obviously detrimental effect such posturing has had on Russian influence. It would also help make sense of Russias apparent need to belittle Ukrainian statehood aspirations while depicting Ukrainian patriotism as an extremist menace


http://bunews.com.ua/opinion/item/opinion-russian-retreat-from-ukraine-is-a-tale-of-unforced-kremlin-errors-and-self-defeating-imperial-hubris
SLAVA UKRAYINI  ! HEROYAM SLAVA!!!!
Слава Украине! Слава героям слава!Слава Україні! Слава героям!
 translated as: Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!!!  is a Ukrainian greeting slogan being used now all over Ukraine to signify support for a free independent Ukraine

Offline alex330

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2242
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Male
  • Spouse's Country: Ukraine
  • Status: Married 5-10 years
  • Trips: 4 - 10
Re: Ukraine can build an army to beat Putin
« Reply #23 on: May 07, 2018, 10:07:49 AM »
How Ukraine can build an army to beat Putin

Ukraine can develop new weaponry with funding from countries like Saudi Arabia....

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articles-view/release/3/189623/ukraine-releases-more-data-on-hrim_2-srbm.html

Putin better hurry up....

Offline krimster2

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1626
  • Country: us
  • Spouse's Country: Russia
  • Status: Looking 1-2 years
  • Trips: None (yet)
Re: The Struggle For Ukraine
« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2018, 10:40:24 AM »
<krimster2>
daily departures from NAS Sigonella, Italy, multiple USAF Northrop Grumman RQ-4B (10-2043) with super advanced AI optics flying surveillance mission over eastern Ukraine

stay sharp boyz!!!


big build-up!!! on both sides!!!!

is it for show?
or will Putin break bad again?

if Trump is impeached, will Putin attack eastern Ukraine in force?
is the media campaign in Russia assuring Russians that when theyre disconnected from SWIFT that all will be well, part of the information campaign for this war?


 

+-RWD Stats

Members
Total Members: 9780
Latest: JosephCow
New This Month: 14
New This Week: 2
New Today: 2
Stats
Total Posts: 475868
Total Topics: 18829
Most Online Today: 1348
Most Online Ever: 2127
(March 20, 2014, 11:07:42 PM)
Users Online
Members: 34
Guests: 1295
Total: 1329

+-Recent Posts

Re: EU Issues by Trenchcoat
Today at 12:55:24 AM

Putin admits Russia staged the referendum to annex Crimea by JayH
Today at 12:49:04 AM

Why I returned to Ukraine by JayH
Today at 12:33:24 AM

Re: EU Issues by BillyB
Yesterday at 07:32:43 PM

Re: EU Issues by Trenchcoat
Yesterday at 07:17:47 PM

Re: My first trip to Ukraine - May-June 2018 by Trenchcoat
Yesterday at 06:53:09 PM

Re: My first trip to Ukraine - May-June 2018 by JayH
Yesterday at 05:44:15 PM

Re: My first trip to Ukraine - May-June 2018 by SteveInBoston
Yesterday at 05:28:40 PM

Re: My first trip to Ukraine - May-June 2018 by Davo2
Yesterday at 05:10:39 PM

Re: My first trip to Ukraine - May-June 2018 by Trenchcoat
Yesterday at 04:56:38 PM

Powered by EzPortal