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Author Topic: Cultural food item in FSU Countries  (Read 1189 times)

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Online jone

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Cultural food item in FSU Countries
« on: July 04, 2018, 12:37:55 PM »
I learned this morning the difference between Morse and Compote.  It seems Morse is a fruit drink, made with fresh fruit and Compote is made with stewed or even sauced fruits.  For instance, this morning I was cutting up some strawberries to put in my tea and was advised that this was 'morse'.  But had I taken the stewed apricots I had in the 'fridge', and added them to my tea, that would have been 'compote'. 

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Offline Boethius

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Re: Cultural food item in FSU Countries
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2018, 12:58:48 PM »
In Ukraine, compote can be made either with dried or fresh fruit.  My understanding is mors is made with berries (cranberries, exclusively, in my experience), but that comes solely from my time in Kyiv.

I asked the better half, and he said the same thing, and that came from his grandparents.  His grandparents grew up in Moscow and St. Petersburg, so I can't say their examples are Ukrainian.

So perhaps the explanations are regional.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2018, 01:13:13 PM by Boethius »
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Online jone

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Re: Cultural food item in FSU Countries
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2018, 01:57:07 PM »
The cultural sensitivity advice I am getting is direct from a Russian from the Southern Urals.  When I said I was making compote, I was corrected and told it was morse. 
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Offline DaveNY

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Re: Cultural food item in FSU Countries
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2018, 03:03:49 PM »
In Russia mors (морс)  is a fruit drink made with berries. Most any type of berries although lingonberries are common. Blueberries and strawberries will also do as will other berries.

Boil in water, add sugar or sugar syrup. Add some aromatic essences, mint, thyme, etc. if desired. Of course it wouldn't be Russian if not used in a cocktail Vodka anyone? 

Wife loves it. She makes a non alcoholic version that I enjoy. Our girls love it.   

Offline ML

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Re: Cultural food item in FSU Countries
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2018, 03:05:46 PM »
Spouse's family in Ukraine west and south of Kyiv makes compote all summer long.  Each fruit in turn as its time for ripening comes. Her parents have huge garden and fruit orchard with virtually all the possible fruit trees for that area. They make something like 2 gallon each morning and it is gone by bedtime for 4-5 people.
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Offline BdHvA

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Re: Cultural food item in FSU Countries
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2018, 07:23:08 PM »
I suspect each region and even family have there own variations of compote and mors.

I should mention the native cranberries in New England and have been cultivated further abroad in Canada, South America and The Netherlands. The cranberries of Russia and Ukraine are a different genus or type and are not cultivated in the same way as say Massachusetts or New Jersey. One can in Kiev buy North American cranberries from Ocean Spray, clearly marked as produce of the United States.


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Offline SANDRO43

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Re: Cultural food item in FSU Countries
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2018, 07:26:08 PM »
Quote
Compote conformed to the medieval belief that fruit cooked in sugar syrup balanced the effects of humidity on the body. The name is derived from the Latin word compositus, meaning mixture. In late medieval England it was served at the beginning of the last course of a feast (or sometimes the second of three courses), often accompanied by a creamy potage. During the Renaissance, it was served chilled at the end of dinner. Because it was easy to prepare, made from inexpensive ingredients and contained no dairy products, compote became a staple of Jewish households throughout Europe. In modern French, the term refers to usually unsweetened fruit purée without fruit chunks, such as applesauce
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compote

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Offline southernX

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Re: Cultural food item in FSU Countries
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2018, 11:26:55 PM »
wifey & her  family make compote , in ukraine /russia and here in oz

any fresh or dried /canned fruit can be used

they usually like to us efresh fruit though  like apples , cherries , plumbs , apricots and strawberries mostly , simmered up , cooled , strained and then consumed in volumes

it is very tasty and thirst quenching ime

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Online msmob

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Re: Cultural food item in FSU Countries
« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2018, 11:41:40 PM »
For instance, this morning I was cutting up some strawberries to put in my tea and was advised that this was 'morse'.
I learn something every day.

Given the interpretation of Mors (e)   -  berries blended - as in pulped finely - with drinking water - I've not 'learnt' - I'm confused.. ;)




Offline ML

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Re: Cultural food item in FSU Countries
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2019, 09:56:05 AM »
wifey & her  family make compote , in ukraine /russia and here in oz

any fresh or dried /canned fruit can be used

they usually like to use fresh fruit though  like apples , cherries , plums , apricots and strawberries mostly , simmered up , cooled , strained and then consumed in volumes

it is very tasty and thirst quenching imo.

SX

Wife's parents have huge garden and orchard.
She tells that almost every day from Spring through Fall they make a large kettle of compote using what ever fruit is ripe.
Winston Churchill.  “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.”

 

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