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Author Topic: Trench's Questions and Philosophies  (Read 112232 times)

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Online Trenchcoat

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2150 on: August 12, 2018, 03:49:38 PM »
don't understand why you don't live in London, or other big city, especially with that education

Expense, even rent costs a fortune up there now for a squalid hole of a place never mind buying.  Prices are astronomical, you're talking around £300K plus for a piddley little ex council flat if busing, crazy, stupid money.

I've turned down going for jobs up there from agencies the pay would be too little, it would all go on living costs so nothing in it for me.

Offline BdHvA

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2151 on: August 12, 2018, 03:57:21 PM »
My first Undergraduate degree is in History, my second more recent degree is in Architecture.

Interesting.

For some one who rails against the Royal Family I suspect from understanding your view point, you must applaud Prince Charles's opinions on Post 2nd World War architecture in London.

Personally the designs of E. Lutyens fascinates me, and in some ways it precedes that of F. L. Wright. But if you see what his work in New Delhi is, it is simply depressing. Better to get A. Kapoor and start all over.

Experierence is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you. A. Huxley

Offline krimster2

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2152 on: August 12, 2018, 04:29:06 PM »
i was poor when I got out of university Trench!
had to live with roommates to share costs, drove a car that was more of a functioning wreck than anything else
all of my possessions would fit in 3 car loads
my bank account after my first year of working post grad school was maybe 3 or 4 thousand US dollars
spent the rest of my life pulling myself up
granted I happen to be in a profession that was in high demand
I really know nothing about architecture career wise
but I assume it's like most professions, that there's some career path where after 10 yr or so, you achieve some measure of "success"
that you keep climbing "up the hill"

Offline krimster2

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2153 on: August 12, 2018, 04:40:21 PM »
"Prices are astronomical, you're talking around £300K"

but 10% down isn't bad, get a big enough place to have a roommate to help with expenses
you should be able to do it
the first house I bought was a little tiny place for almost the same price, I put 10% down!!!
you already outright own a place, you can use that as security to borrow and buy an investment property
fix it up and sell it and then again and again
while you're working for some "firm"
I really have no idea about the UK job market for architects
but if you had your salary in the USA with your educational background, I'd think that there was something wrong, like you were living in Mississippi or some other "god forsaken" part of the country or you had prison tattoos on your forehead, or SOMETHING
you should be able to better than what you're doing now, I'm just too far "out of the picture" to see what's wrong


Online rwd123

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2154 on: August 12, 2018, 05:04:10 PM »
A degree is just a piece of paper. You need to leverage it to stuff your wallet with other little bits of paper.

If you think small time, you'll always be small time. That's a losing strategy, because girls will sense it and be repelled.

You've gotta think like a boss.









Online msmob

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2155 on: August 12, 2018, 08:26:51 PM »

Where are your degrees from-The OU? Lol

Furthering oneself - all v. laudable -  but I note you ducked JG's question about the Open University.....


The internet, in the end, was not designed to give people the information they need. It gives people the information they want.

Offline krimster2

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2156 on: August 12, 2018, 08:46:21 PM »
Trench,
   you don't have to thank me for what I'm about to do, but I've got EVERYTHING all "sussed out" for you, really...really...

here's what ya do!!!!

1. rent out your property in the village
2. rent a cheap place in London
3. get an architect job in a London firm, and work your butt off there (quick look on google says you can make £40,000/yr)
4. sell your properties in the village
5. use the money from your property sale as a down payment on a property in London
6. get a roommate to help share expenses, maybe even a FEMALE one
7. profit£

while in London, you have IMMENSE social opportunities, my cousin is involved in dancing and art groups
you'd have a GREAT life there!

well, there it is...

alright, my work here is done...



Offline krimster2

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2157 on: August 12, 2018, 09:20:49 PM »
when I was young, Oxford had a correspondence school, kinda like on-line learning, pre-internet
if I remember correctly if you did 3 yr of correspondence , you could do your fourth at OXFORD!!!

t'was my fantasy!  if I spoke "received pronunciation" English in the USA w/ degree from Oxford
I would have been physically exhausted from the sheer volume of sex i'd be having
plus when I went to cemeteries  to scare folks in their little rendezvous there in the evenings
I'd probably get even more with the abandoned large breasted wimmin desperate for comfort and safety
damn.... coulda....woulda....
I can still see billyb running as fast as possible buck naked down the path, and hearing this little, barely perceptible "slap,slap,slap"
of his little willy bouncing off his stomach as he ran
DAMN, that'd be funny



Offline JayH

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2158 on: August 13, 2018, 01:39:13 AM »
K--  not sure if you are naive or just being far too kind !!
TC is NOT an architect ---  at the most --a low level draughtsman -probably  doing local council work !

My guess is that any "qualifications" he holds came out of a 'wheatie" packet !

As for your entrepreneurial suggests -- all fine for someone with a brain  in their head !  Or for someone who is not just bone lazy !

However --TC is the sort of guy that applauds when a business owner goes broke and loses his home -- that is what makes him feel so "superior" !!

He has repeatedly shown his total lack of "nous" -- across a range of issues -- and his stupid smugness because he "owns" his own "home" !

His general lack of empathy or understanding of human issues all leads back to my original assessment!
SLAVA UKRAYINI  ! HEROYAM SLAVA!!!!
Слава Украине! Слава героям слава!Слава Україні! Слава героям!
 translated as: Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!!!  is a Ukrainian greeting slogan being used now all over Ukraine to signify support for a free independent Ukraine

Online Trenchcoat

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2159 on: August 13, 2018, 02:35:14 AM »
K--  not sure if you are naive or just being far too kind !!
TC is NOT an architect ---  at the most --a low level draughtsman -probably  doing local council work !

My guess is that any "qualifications" he holds came out of a 'wheatie" packet !

As for your entrepreneurial suggests -- all fine for someone with a brain  in their head !  Or for someone who is not just bone lazy !

However --TC is the sort of guy that applauds when a business owner goes broke and loses his home -- that is what makes him feel so "superior" !!

He has repeatedly shown his total lack of "nous" -- across a range of issues -- and his stupid smugness because he "owns" his own "home" !

His general lack of empathy or understanding of human issues all leads back to my original assessment!

No I am not an Architect, I just said I had a degree in Architecture - Architectural Technology to be exact. To be an Architect you need the actual Architecture degree then another one year  out in an architecture practice to qualify for entry onto a one year diploma course (part2) then after passing that at least another year out in practice before taking the final (part 3) exam - a six month to a year long process or something like that.

So a minimum of seven years to become a fully qualified Architect, few do it in this time though more so than used to. Generally most will do it over at least 10 years or more - spending more time out on practice.

Then if they wish to set up an Architecture Practice by themselves that's a whole new ball game - loads of competition and a need to show previous clients and testimonials. Without such you would have a very quiet day every day most likely. Even with such you would have to win clients, deal with the ordeal of both clients wants an the planning system and probably building control also, contractors, suppliers, etc. After that you would have to hope you get enough money in to at least pay for running costs and your wages - at least enough to live on at a bare minimum.

In the UK anyone could start up an Architecture Practice, qualification or not. Only fully qualified Architects can call themselves Architects ie in their Advertising or its a court case and hefty fine. However, much of the general public is oblivious to this. In any case there is just loads of competition, also if the building industry suffers a slow down such as on the credit crunch a decade back so do you - some practices decimated their staff levels closing whole offices. So still sound like a good idea to get involved in that game?

Both of my degrees came from recognised established Universities. OU don't do any sort of Architecture degree's as it tends to take a fair amount of classroom time. Fact of the matter is I could whip most Architects at what they do any day of the week, but getting into starting an Architecture practice is a big outlay if yiu mran to go about it seriously and you need decent clients to be assured a return on that outlay. So I choose to do what I do for a more assured return on my investment :)

Online John Gaunt

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2160 on: August 13, 2018, 03:27:44 AM »
No I am not an Architect, I just said I had a degree in Architecture - Architectural Technology to be exact. To be an Architect you need the actual Architecture degree then another one year  out in an architecture practice to qualify for entry onto a one year diploma course (part2) then after passing that at least another year out in practice before taking the final (part 3) exam - a six month to a year long process or something like that.

So a minimum of seven years to become a fully qualified Architect, few do it in this time though more so than used to. Generally most will do it over at least 10 years or more - spending more time out on practice.

Then if they wish to set up an Architecture Practice by themselves that's a whole new ball game - loads of competition and a need to show previous clients and testimonials. Without such you would have a very quiet day every day most likely. Even with such you would have to win clients, deal with the ordeal of both clients wants an the planning system and probably building control also, contractors, suppliers, etc. After that you would have to hope you get enough money in to at least pay for running costs and your wages - at least enough to live on at a bare minimum.

In the UK anyone could start up an Architecture Practice, qualification or not. Only fully qualified Architects can call themselves Architects ie in their Advertising or its a court case and hefty fine. However, much of the general public is oblivious to this. In any case there is just loads of competition, also if the building industry suffers a slow down such as on the credit crunch a decade back so do you - some practices decimated their staff levels closing whole offices. So still sound like a good idea to get involved in that game?

Both of my degrees came from recognised established Universities. OU don't do any sort of Architecture degree's as it tends to take a fair amount of classroom time. Fact of the matter is I could whip most Architects at what they do any day of the week, but getting into starting an Architecture practice is a big outlay if yiu mran to go about it seriously and you need decent clients to be assured a return on that outlay. So I choose to do what I do for a more assured return on my investment :)
Architectural Technology, eh. Sounds like one of those made up courses of no use to man or beast in the real world. In the old days it was probably akin to a BTec qualification at the Polytechnics ( which suddenly became ‘universities’).
So tell us which established universities you attended for your degrees?

So, here’s another glimpse into TrenchWorld: On running a business
-be risk averse and
-expect clients to come knocking on your door.


Offline krimster2

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2161 on: August 13, 2018, 05:52:01 AM »
here in the USA, we employ a term called "Tiger Mom", it means an overbearing mother who is usually an Asian immigrant and not native born who berates their children if they don't do their homework sort of thing

i'm a Tiger Dad, I am involved in my children's education on a daily basis, and I "programmed" them to want to pursue a medical degree, and have done this "since they were knee high to a grasshopper", for example, the type of toys I'd buy them, type of books I'd buy them and so on, and it's worked!!!!

I come from a multi-ethnic background, my mother's family is solid British middle-class from the West Midlands, and I've spent a lot of time with them, I used to spend summers there when I was a little nipper, I feel I know the culture well, and I am a total Anglophile

my father came from Jewish immigrants who fled the Russian pogrom in Odessa

I love both, but there is a big difference between the two cultures

my dad's family is VERY intellectual, most men including my dad decided on a career in law, or medicine
all the moms in my dad's family are Tiger Moms
I think the only reason I became an electrical engineer instead of a doctor, was because I didn't have a Jewish mother, but a British one
in the UK, I'd define my British males relatives, with a few exceptions, as less "driven" less motivated to succeed, because their mother's weren't pushing them to
it's not that they are lazy, far from it they work very hard, and not that they're less intelligent
I think that if you're British, you don't feel the same insecurity, the same "pressure" that a non British non-WASP immigrant will feel
and that insecurity is a "valve" that controls your drive and motivation

so IMHO, Trench's issues somewhat relate to this...


Offline BdHvA

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2162 on: August 13, 2018, 06:10:06 AM »
Architectural Technology

I believe this in the States means an Architectural Engineer. One can earn quite well in this field.
Experierence is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you. A. Huxley

Online Trenchcoat

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2163 on: August 13, 2018, 06:27:50 AM »
Architectural Technology, eh. In the old days it was probably akin to a BTec qualification at the Polytechnics ( which suddenly became ‘universities’).
So tell us which established universities you attended for your degrees?

So, here’s another glimpse into TrenchWorld: On running a business
-be risk averse and
-expect clients to come knocking on your door.

Correct it was from a former Poly but nearly all Architectural Technology courses are. On the contrary to your other point it is very useful, it deals with the materials, specification and practicalities of building a building. Whereas Architecture deals with concept, form and aesthetic. Architects don't really get onto the technical side much until much later in their career - this is what Part 3 deals with in part.

Hence theoretically I could open up and Architecture Practice straight away and have an idea of what I am doing - an Architecture undergrad is very unlikely too, their degree is nearly aways far too arty farty to have a clue what if really takes to build a building.

That said it takes clients for an architecture practice to survive or any business really. The Web is full of people deluding themselves that they have a practice when really it is just all playing at being one - they have no clients and likely will never have any. I have no inclination to add myself to that list it's a sad existence I'm sure.

To me the idea of a business is to make money not cost me money. I don't see the point of putting effort in for little return either.

My History degree was from a traditional university technically speaking though not that old compared to mother of the traditional universities.

Online Trenchcoat

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2164 on: August 13, 2018, 06:34:00 AM »
Well Krimster I think most immigrants have a work hard mentality when they arrive. However, after a while most get settled and come to know the system and society and get more like the local population in terms of work ethic. It's the unsettled nature of immigration that makes the most difference.

It's not true I did not work hard in education, I did all thd way through and for longer than most. There is not a high percentage of thd UK population than has two undergraduate degree's,  a Masters degree and a load of other qualifications.

Though people in the UK tend to be very qualification oriented as it very competitive here.

Online msmob

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2165 on: August 13, 2018, 07:00:45 AM »
So now, you have a Masters Degree?

Sorry, Trench - but given your inability to prove most of your points - I rather doubt it ((
The internet, in the end, was not designed to give people the information they need. It gives people the information they want.

Online John Gaunt

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2166 on: August 13, 2018, 07:28:45 AM »
Well Krimster I think most immigrants have a work hard mentality when they arrive. However, after a while most get settled and come to know the system and society and get more like the local population in terms of work ethic. It's the unsettled nature of immigration that makes the most difference.

It's not true I did not work hard in education, I did all thd way through and for longer than most. There is not a high percentage of thd UK population than has two undergraduate degree's,  a Masters degree and a load of other qualifications.

Though people in the UK tend to be very qualification oriented as it very competitive here.
One can have a string of qualifications and yet, still be illiterate.

Offline Jumper

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2167 on: August 13, 2018, 12:07:26 PM »
TC, why did you bother with the time and expense of obtaining a Masters if you have the attitude the job opportunities it opens up are not worth the time to establish yourself in them?

I'm not bashing you, it's just a question.

You'll forgive me, I'm not degreed,
And when someone owned a business,  was looking to hire,  I certainly did not find that degrading to take their offer of employment.
They set the terms, as they own the business.
If I accepted their terms I appreciatiated they had the success,and took the risks needed, to gainfully employ others.
I always did the responsibilities of my job and then some, all the while feeling grateful to an employer as its understood their costs in employing me are far greater than just my salary or hourly wage.
I was the one looking for a job,and accepted stated terms.

 Somehow relationships with women were never difficult, or about monetary things.

I do work for myself now, but it's still solidly blue collar, so I just don't truly understand someone with your credentials not using them.
Perhaps you do with your hourly consulting type of job?
Those can be quite lucrative as well.

Like others have said, if it isnt in your area, relocate.
Yes it might take several years to establish oneself, but it beats the heck put of where you have gotten the last couple of decades I'd think?


Anyway. I don't subscribe to the notion that there is no hope for you to be married.

Most men do marry,regardless the size of their wallet, portfolio, or baggage.

« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 03:34:38 PM by Jumper »
.

Online Trenchcoat

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2168 on: August 13, 2018, 05:30:53 PM »
TC, why did you bother with the time and expense of obtaining a Masters if you have the attitude the job opportunities it opens up are not worth the time to establish yourself in them?

I'm not bashing you, it's just a question.

You'll forgive me, I'm not degreed,
And when someone owned a business,  was looking to hire,  I certainly did not find that degrading to take their offer of employment.
They set the terms, as they own the business.
If I accepted their terms I appreciatiated they had the success,and took the risks needed, to gainfully employ others.
I always did the responsibilities of my job and then some, all the while feeling grateful to an employer as its understood their costs in employing me are far greater than just my salary or hourly wage.
I was the one looking for a job,and accepted stated terms.

 Somehow relationships with women were never difficult, or about monetary things.

I do work for myself now, but it's still solidly blue collar, so I just don't truly understand someone with your credentials not using them.
Perhaps you do with your hourly consulting type of job?
Those can be quite lucrative as well.

Like others have said, if it isnt in your area, relocate.
Yes it might take several years to establish oneself, but it beats the heck put of where you have gotten the last couple of decades I'd think?


Anyway. I don't subscribe to the notion that there is no hope for you to be married.

Most men do marry,regardless the size of their wallet, portfolio, or baggage.

Its really a UK thing its a case of oversupply across many industries, lawyers are oversupplied so get low pay and struggle for opportunities - eventually they may get high pay 'if' they rise high enough, same foe many other professions. That's the problem of open door immigration policy to all EU nations.

Well, the terms the practices put forward are not good enough to make it worth my while, I am fortunate in being able to put my Architectural skills to my own use and make more money than I would do working for them. I've never been a cocksucker and have no wish to start now.

I appreicate your thoughts on my marriage chances, we'll just have to see how it goes, it either will or won't happen I guess.

Online Trenchcoat

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2169 on: August 13, 2018, 05:38:29 PM »
If you dress better and are better groomed, you'll look better in photos. If your brain is where it should be, what you write will be attractive to women.

You can't expect all women to like you. As you can see, there are some at this forum that think my view on politics and how the world should work is very wrong. Your goal shouldn't be to get women to like you. Your goal should be to get women to respect you. They won't love you if they don't respect you.

I've just been looking at my profile photos and realised they are all head/upper body pics so even they can really see how I am dressed fully. I think this may be part of the problem. I think I've already got some good clothes though always more that might be done I guess, so if I go out and take some decent full body poses and see how that goes I'm thinking.

Offline krimster2

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2170 on: August 13, 2018, 08:54:45 PM »
"I think this may be part of the problem."

in perhaps the same way that a grain of sand is part of a vast golden beach

No Trench, there is something bigger going on
i'm sure deep down, you KNOW what it must be, even if I do not
and until you free yourself from whatever it is, your life will keep going the way it always has
either free yourself, or accept that who you are now, is who you shall remain


« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 09:15:00 PM by krimster2 »

Online John Gaunt

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2171 on: August 14, 2018, 12:12:12 AM »
TC, why did you bother with the time and expense of obtaining a Masters if you have the attitude the job opportunities it opens up are not worth the time to establish yourself in them?

I'm not bashing you, it's just a question.

You'll forgive me, I'm not degreed,
And when someone owned a business,  was looking to hire,  I certainly did not find that degrading to take their offer of employment.
They set the terms, as they own the business.
If I accepted their terms I appreciatiated they had the success,and took the risks needed, to gainfully employ others.
I always did the responsibilities of my job and then some, all the while feeling grateful to an employer as its understood their costs in employing me are far greater than just my salary or hourly wage.
I was the one looking for a job,and accepted stated terms.

 Somehow relationships with women were never difficult, or about monetary things.

I do work for myself now, but it's still solidly blue collar, so I just don't truly understand someone with your credentials not using them.
Perhaps you do with your hourly consulting type of job?
Those can be quite lucrative as well.

Like others have said, if it isnt in your area, relocate.
Yes it might take several years to establish oneself, but it beats the heck put of where you have gotten the last couple of decades I'd think?


Anyway. I don't subscribe to the notion that there is no hope for you to be married.

Most men do marry,regardless the size of their wallet, portfolio, or baggage.
You’re quite right, most men domarry. However, most men aren’t Trench.

Online John Gaunt

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2172 on: August 14, 2018, 12:19:03 AM »
Its really a UK thing its a case of oversupply across many industries, lawyers are oversupplied so get low pay and struggle for opportunities - eventually they may get high pay 'if' they rise high enough, same foe many other professions. That's the problem of open door immigration policy to all EU nations.

Well, the terms the practices put forward are not good enough to make it worth my while, I am fortunate in being able to put my Architectural skills to my own use and make more money than I would do working for them. I've never been a cocksucker and have no wish to start now.

I appreicate your thoughts on my marriage chances, we'll just have to see how it goes, it either will or won't happen I guess.
Yet again, you make sweeping generalisations without any empirical data to substantiate your absurd claims.
This is a common recurring theme with you i.e. all UK women are fat, all UK jobs are low paid,
all employers are bloodsuckers and so on.
Were you dropped on the head as a baby?

Offline Blighty

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2173 on: August 14, 2018, 12:57:20 AM »
So now, you have a Masters Degree?

Sorry, Trench - but given your inability to prove most of your points - I rather doubt it ((

One can have a string of qualifications and yet, still be illiterate.

Why all the negativity about TC's qualifications? You have not met him personally and so have little idea of what he is really like! Half the time his posts are probably intended to wind-up his enemies on the forum. He is certainly succeeding as you take them all hook, line and sinker. Just an observation about this forum from a casual reader.

Online John Gaunt

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Re: Trench's Questions and Philosophies
« Reply #2174 on: August 14, 2018, 01:04:08 AM »
Why all the negativity about TC's qualifications? You have not met him personally and so have little idea of what he is really like! Half the time his posts are probably intended to wind-up his enemies on the forum. He is certainly succeeding as you take them all hook, line and sinker. Just an observation about this forum from a casual reader.
What positives do you see in Trench? One can only address the persona projected here so speculation about his real personality is pointless.
No one is anyone’s enemy here. Do you always take forum life so seriously?

 

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